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Old 10-10-2018, 11:45 AM   #31
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Yes, that was my theory as well, but the change was so drastic it didnít seem logical.
Try playing around with the pressures. It makes a huge difference in mine.
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Old 10-10-2018, 03:53 PM   #32
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Went to alignment shop

He felt the steering stabilizer was way too tough, not to mention it was visibly not smooth--as he tried to turn the wheel, it felt like it was hitting a bump around mid-point.. Maybe a feature of the stabilize neither of us understand?

We took it off.

He improved toe in from it being negative (tires trying to drive from each other) to slighly positive (0.03 on each side). The caster ls L 2.56, R.2.77. Camber is L: 0.17, R: 0.14

I am going to come back next week and we'll work on the caster. He agreed to install these Moog parts I brought with me was a good idea, was just out of time (K8986 Caster/Camber Adjusting Bushing).

Frankly, while the steering wheel is a bit too loose (too easy) for my taste, the van does seem easier to drive and control, although I can't say I am fully confident with it.

He did recommend I get a different simpler/weaker stabilizer, but I may hold off on that until caster is done.
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Old 10-10-2018, 04:06 PM   #33
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I've never seen a stabilizer that had a bump or detent. I think that was probably part of your problem. People often throw a beefy stabilizer on as a band-aid in the hopes that it will fix shimmy or "death wobble" issues that are really caused by worn-out parts. At best it covers them up, but at the cost of heavier steering effort and poorer self-centering.
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Old 10-10-2018, 04:12 PM   #34
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Make sure the stabilizer isn't contacting anything through out it's range. It's also best to have it mounted parallel to the tie rod, rather than at an angle since that can vary the leverage as the tie rod moves from one side to the other.
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Old 10-10-2018, 06:37 PM   #35
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It wasn't touching anything mechanically
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Old 10-10-2018, 11:12 PM   #36
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I agree with joe (wahoo) regarding an over dampening steering stabilizer making steering problems worse. I just installed an Agile steering stabilizer and removed a pitiful puny stabilizer. I think the "swim" is worse now. It bothered me from the start that the steering stabilizer doesn't allow the steering to naturally return to center. I think it also dampens the hundreds of miniscule steering corrections we make almost unconsiously to keep the van in the lane and on the road. I'm now having to concentrate more on driving than before. I'm all for an adjustable steering stabilizer as joe suggested.

I've been driving Jeeps for years and in the early years without power steering. Back then I thought the steering stabilizer dampened road input to the steering like when you hit a rock and the steering wheel tries to remove your thumbs! Now I think we need them but to absorb shock and not inhibit steering imput.
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Old 10-11-2018, 07:21 AM   #37
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I've never seen a stabilizer that had a bump or detent.
We let all the air (nitrogen?) out of it yesterday. There was very little pressure in it. I was able to barely push it together (out of curiosity) in by pressing on top of it. How easy are these things supposed to be to move? Are you supposed to be able to fill it with air compressor? Wandering if it's a dud.
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Old 10-11-2018, 08:22 AM   #38
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Call up John at Agile to get the pressure specs, but Iím pretty sure a few pumps from a bike pump would be the method, pretty small reservoir, otherwise Iíd imagine you could over pressurize pretty quickly using a compressor.
As a side note, I noticed these Fox steering stabilizers are a bit different than others, at least to the Bilstein that I had on before. The Bilstein stabilizer was like a normal shock, pressurized to push the piston OUT. The Fox on the other hand I believe is whatís called a neutral force pressurized stabilizer, it does not push the piston out, itís designed to have the same force applied to push AND pull and will change those forces relative to the amount of air pressure that itís set at.
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Old 10-11-2018, 09:02 AM   #39
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Are you supposed to be able to fill it with air compressor? Wandering if it's a dud.
Nitrogen is used because it doesn't contain any moisture, and it tends to expand less with heat. That's to say, in a regular shock, it remains at a more stable pressure as the temp rises due to the action of the shock. It also is quite dry as opposed to air, which contains a lot of moisture. I suppose that moisture could cause internal corrosion eventually. It's also my understanding that the Fox steering dampers are simply a regular shock that has been re-valved to have the same amount of dampening in both direction as opposed to different amounts of compression and rebound. At least, that's how John at Agile built mine.
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Old 10-11-2018, 09:16 AM   #40
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My mechanic diagnosed that I had a severely worn tie rod end. So relieved, as I am pretty sure that this going to fix my problem!
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