Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 07-11-2019, 09:54 AM   #11
Senior Member
 
carringb's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Corvallis, OR
Posts: 4,173
Those caster numbers looked good.

Might not hurt to get actual scale weights. 80 psi in the rear is likely too high as well. 80 psi = 6,000 pounds rear axle weight, and if you removed all the heavy stuff, and aren't carrying 15 people, you are probably closer to 4,000 pounds on the rear axle.

One thing I just thought of... makes sure all the linkages ball joints etc have good grease. Old grease (or no grease!) will cause stiction, that causes too-much movement when it finally moves
__________________

__________________
2000 E350 extended wagon dually
V10 w/ Banks Powerpack, Diablo Predator
Buckstop Outback bumper/grill guard
Reunel rear bumper
carringb is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-11-2019, 10:42 AM   #12
Junior Member
 
happycampingcouple's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Location: Olympia, WA
Posts: 15
Just returned from Harbor Freight with a new set of shims. I did the two person method previously and felt a tiny bit of slop... When I removed the shaft the first time, I could feel a little movement while twisting each end... My mechanic didnt agree... I know I am probably over sensitive to the play that I am feeling, but I wanna make sure I have done all I can do before accepting the result...

I guess we will find out if this shaft can be shimmed!!

Thanks again Mike T.

PS, CarringB, I reduced my tire PSI to about 52 front and 64 rear. drove streets and highway. I didnt notice any better handling, just felt more of the bumps on the road. But, we will see! Thank you!!

I will report back later today.

Mike B
__________________

happycampingcouple is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-11-2019, 02:37 PM   #13
Junior Member
 
happycampingcouple's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Location: Olympia, WA
Posts: 15
Soooo...

I removed the steering shaft and I couldn't separate the telescoping pieces... They are round, one goes into the other and there is some kind of stopper inside the shaft...

I moved the steering wheel back and forth before I started and held the shaft in my other hand (no funny comments please!) I could feel and hear a small knock, but could not locate where the sound is coming from.

I took the airbag off and wrenched down on the bolt that holds the steering wheel. I "think" I felt it tighten or it was just my harbor freight torx driver groan??

I think I am gonna call it good till I can spend a couple hundred on a new steering shaft and the ujoint under the steering wheel... then I will replace and see if anything changed...

Carringb, Maybe I will jump down there again with my grease gun, who knows the mechanic could had forgotten to add the grease?? Glad the caster degrees are to your liking. I am hoping to start with a Helwig rear sway bar, then maybe the Weldtec stabilizer and finish it off with a rear sway bar...

Thanks again Mike T and CarringB!
happycampingcouple is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-11-2019, 03:28 PM   #14
Senior Member
 
carringb's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Corvallis, OR
Posts: 4,173
The Hellwig rear sway bar is a nice upgrade for handling. I don't think it will affect the play you have now, but I certainly recommend them.

IMO, the Hellwig front sway bar is overkill on anything smaller than a motorhome, with the exception of maybe a van with a forward weight bias and heavy roof loads. The EB vans tend to stay mostly rear-weight-biased especially once built out, and I like to keep roll-stiffness-bias approximately equivalent to weight-bias, to keep the tires planted on the opposite end.
__________________
2000 E350 extended wagon dually
V10 w/ Banks Powerpack, Diablo Predator
Buckstop Outback bumper/grill guard
Reunel rear bumper
carringb is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-11-2019, 05:24 PM   #15
Junior Member
 
happycampingcouple's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Location: Olympia, WA
Posts: 15
Carringb, Thanks for your help. I greased all the fittings on the front end and did notice a little improvement... Yep, Im gonna call it a success... its not perfect, but its seems better...

Now to start looking into the Helwig rear bar!
happycampingcouple is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-12-2019, 10:08 PM   #16
Senior Member
 
86Scotty's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: TN
Posts: 8,191
I strongly recommend you stop throwing money and time at this and accept that itís tires and pressure. Youíve done everything else and then more. You should definitely feel LESS bumps and road feedback with less pressure, not more. Tires are a huge part of your suspension.

E-series vans are absolutely scary to drive with bad tires and too much air pressure. I recommend 50F/55R. What tires are you running?

Also, the other problem is that youíre expecting a van designed in the late 80ís (or earlier) to drive like your Murano. Itís not going to happen EVER. E series are old and they are heavy duty trucks. Go drive a Transit or Sprinter and youíll probably be trading within a week.

This is not popular advice here among a primarily E series crowd but it is all true and tested many vans over by me and others. Most here know me and know Iím not knocking the E series. Iíve had 6 or more. You simply canít match the advancement of technology with so old a design.

Good luck to you, youíre running out of options and hopefully will find a cure or just upgrade the van.
__________________
Currently vanless. Weird.
86Scotty is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-12-2019, 10:59 PM   #17
Senior Member
 
arctictraveller's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Posts: 2,810
After several years, I finally got my van (2001 E250 4wd) driving acceptably. I've replaced most all the front end componants except the ball joints, including adding a Redhead box. Interestingly, the box was delivered adjusted too tightly, and upon the advice of Redhead, I had to loosen the adjustment to get the steering to self center. So, don't discount the box just because it's new (to you). Everything I did seemed to help a little, but I still had to chase the wheel to go straight down the road. Finally, a few weeks ago I installed new tires for my Alaska trip even though my Duratracs had adequate tread. The Cooper Discover ATs were a shocking improvement. They made me realize my old tires weren't round, and just as good, they were much smoother and quieter. Then I removed my steering damper. It was the final piece of the puzzle. With the damper on, a slight wheel correction did little, so more correction would result in the van heading off and needing a counter correction which always seemed too much resulting in see sawing down the road. Now, a slight correction moves the van just a little and a slight counter correction moves it back with little drama, so a damper is not always the answer.
__________________
Arctic Traveller
KC6TNI
2001 GTRV
Advanced 4wd
Agile Ride improvement package
www.arctictraveller.com
arctictraveller is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-13-2019, 08:37 AM   #18
Junior Member
 
happycampingcouple's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Location: Olympia, WA
Posts: 15
Thanks for the info 86scotty and artictraveller.

I think I am finally feeling better about this... I will still throw on a rear sway bar...

We are hoping to travel full time again in 2020 and will be towing a small camp trailer. I will be replacing all 4 tires with Michelins. When I purchased the van, it came with a mix of Firestones and another brand. I have replaced one rear with a Michelin and put the Matching Firestones in front. When I do replace all 4, I will use my existing Michelin as a spare. I am also thinking of upgrading to 16x8 wheels... If the boss lady says yes!!

Thanks again for all your input!
happycampingcouple is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-13-2019, 09:08 AM   #19
Senior Member
 
86Scotty's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: TN
Posts: 8,191
I think you're on to something. Crappy tires will definitely make for a crappy ride on these vans. I would go E-rated and something that has been well reviewed on these vans. Can't go wrong with Michelins usually but I don't know many here that run them.

Lots of tire threads here for your perusing enjoyment....

__________________
Currently vanless. Weird.
86Scotty is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-13-2019, 02:43 PM   #20
Member
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: Scottsdale, AZ
Posts: 39
I've been working on getting the last bit of slop and 65mph shimmy out of my front end as well. So far I've done all four ball joints, set preload on wheel bearings/axle nut, all Energy suspension bushings (sway bar, radius arms and i-beams). I haven't gotten into the steering box or column yet, but I did stumble across this. In theory it makes sense that it could fix/lessen the issue. Unfortunately, they only make them for Jeep and GM steering setups. I wonder if it could be modified to work with Fords components. I found a guy who made a set custom for his van on IG, I sent him a message but never got a reply.

https://www.ruffstuffspecialties.com/catalog/R1768.html
__________________

ibike is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

« Sienna Seat in GMC | - »
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off

Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v3.2.3
Disclaimer:

This website is not affiliated with or endorsed by Sportsmobile SIP or any of its affiliates. This is an independent, unofficial site.


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 02:07 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.