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Old 05-23-2019, 09:37 AM   #1
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reseal e-350 fixed windows

I got a quote for resealing the 7 fixed windows that are on my 1998 Ford E-350. It's more than I can spend right now so I guess I'll be doing this myself. I am pretty handy given my 25 years of construction experience. The glass place that did the quote mentioned the stock butyl tape used is a common problem so they wanted to use a urethane sealer as a replacement. I did some google searches and I found some youtube vids. Everyone does a pretty good job of showing how to do this but what I didn't see was what kind of sealer to buy. Any advice as what is the best product for this would be great.

Also, the glass shop quoted about $1050 to do all 7 windows. Does that sound about right? Seemed fair to me based on the amount of work. Just not in the cards for me right now. If it were closer to $600 I might pay to have it done as I am very busy with other life stuff.
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Old 05-23-2019, 11:30 AM   #2
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My quote from a local glass installer was $75 per window if I brought my own. That comes to $525 for 7. Pad it a bit and that is $600. Over a grand means they don't want to do the work.
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Old 05-23-2019, 02:29 PM   #3
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Iíve r/ríd several rear and side van windows using 3M butyl tape. Very easy to do. You just need to be careful when tightening the glass nuts into the door. Iíd say try to do one yourself and see how it goes.
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Old 05-24-2019, 12:22 PM   #4
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Automotive urethane is an adhesive, NOT a "sealer". Improper use and installation of that material in this situation actually requires more skill and experience and time on the job than just replacing or renewing the factory butyl "rope" material. Once its in place you're stuck with it so doing anything after its used becomes a bigger headache.

The real issue with butyl is the attaching nuts on the inside of the van are loose or have worked themselves loose, over time and many miles the glass basically vibrates out causing a loss of seal and the resulting leaks.

If all windows are leaking then yes they all need to be sealed or resealed---if not then there's no real need to go crazy and spend money without a real need. Inspect the existing glass as installed, check the nuts for tightness. Any you find aren't snug use a 9, 10 or 11mm box end wrench to CAREFULLY tighten the loose parts.

You can't simply wrench each bolt down to its limit one at a time----this needs to be done in a circular fashion hitting each one no more than a half turn of the wrench until you feel it almost bottom out against the body. Once done with all windows run a hose WITHOUT a high pressure nozzle to see if any others leak.

There are more than a few replies and posts about this very topic---some I've contributed to in fact. Not being too lazy but I hate to keep repeating myself how this relatively easy chore can become a DIY project IF you have PATIENCE and not in a huge hurry to complete the job.

That glass is NOT cheap---the larger piece towards the rear COSTS ME $800 Add shop time, materials and profit and holy mary you almost need a load to replace it.

PS: I'm in the auto/truck glass biz!
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Old 05-24-2019, 05:19 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Seattle350 View Post
I got a quote for resealing the 7 fixed windows that are on my 1998 Ford E-350. It's more than I can spend right now so I guess I'll be doing this myself. I am pretty handy given my 25 years of construction experience. The glass place that did the quote mentioned the stock butyl tape used is a common problem so they wanted to use a urethane sealer as a replacement. I did some google searches and I found some youtube vids. Everyone does a pretty good job of showing how to do this but what I didn't see was what kind of sealer to buy. Any advice as what is the best product for this would be great.

Also, the glass shop quoted about $1050 to do all 7 windows. Does that sound about right? Seemed fair to me based on the amount of work. Just not in the cards for me right now. If it were closer to $600 I might pay to have it done as I am very busy with other life stuff.

I've done this over the time in all of my windows, is a PITA, nasty job, but for sure you can do it yourself.

Fo this job you'll need:
- big flat screw driver
- shims or more flat screw drivers
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1
- rubbing lcohol
- goo gone
- rags
- a hell lot of beer, depending on the window you're doing, you're in for at least half a day.

1) Remove all the bolts, go in a circle, then put one back at the top screwing only a cople turns
2) Remove the window: stick a flat screw driver between the window frame (black plastic) and the body, twist it to separate the window a little bit, this is usually easier right before where the corners are or between two bolts. You will need to put some shims in between as you keep moving with the screwdriver so it doesn't stick back together. Tip: Don't use the screwdriver as a lever, you'll risk breaking the glass, twist it instead. If it is too hard, grab a utility knife a score a cut in between.
3) After you went all the way around, ask someone to hold the window outside while you take out the one nut you put back in step one, push the window out
4) Clean clean clean.... this is the most tedious part. I use a flat screwdriver as a spatula to get the gunk off,you can also use rubbing alcohol to get it out and goo gone which will literally disintegrate it. I only use goo gone at the end because it makes a real mess if there's some gunk left out. This needs to be done in the window frame and the body. After goo gone always wipe with rubbing alcohol.
For the record, step 4 takes me between half to one day on the big windows.
5) Once both surfaces are clean, reapply the sealer to the window framelike putting tape in a channel). I've used the ribbon linked above(one for a big window)
Tips to apply, start at the bottom middle and work your way around, do not cut it until you get back to the starting point.
6) Reinstall window: carefully align the bolts in the holes and put all the nuts back DO NOT TIGHTEN YET
7) Take the smallest socket wrench you have and grab it as close to the socket as you can (decrease leverage to avoid breaking the glass). Start tighening slowly in circle, do a couple of circles around. It should not be tightened all the way, it should be just enough that the sealing ribbon compresses between the frame and the body.
8) Leak test!
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