Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 08-28-2010, 09:49 AM   #1
Senior Member
 
charlie56's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: santa rosa ca
Posts: 991
Lost and found in Death Valley

I just don't know what to say...


http://pvtimes.com/news/lost-and-found-in-death-valley/


Three women left Pahrump Thursday, July 22, expecting to take a sightseeing tour to Scotty’s Castle in Death Valley and be home in time for dinner.
That was not to be.
Donna Cooper, 62, Gina Cooper, 17, and a house guest visiting from Hong Kong, 19-year-old Jenny Leung, left the Cooper residence around 11 a.m., made the trip to Scotty’s Castle and seemingly disappeared.
Although it was unusual for Donna Cooper to not tell the caretaker for the family’s property — this reporter — that she wasn’t coming home, no one, including Cooper’s husband, who was in Florida, became alarmed until Gina Cooper didn’t show up for work at 4 p.m. Friday afternoon.
Being a responsible young woman, not calling her employer was out-of-the-ordinary.
Rodger Cooper requested his caretaker assist with filing a missing persons report with Nye County Sheriff’s Office and Deputy Mark Cannon was dispatched to take the information. After consulting with Cooper’s husband in Florida by phone, the deputy returned to the sheriff’s office and filed a nationwide “be on the lookout” for the three missing women.

The women had been in Death Valley 28 hours and counting. The family was frantic. Gina Cooper was an athlete for Death Valley Academy but Donna Cooper had been suffering from sudden bouts of heat exhaustion and Leung stood five-foot-seven-inches tall and only weighed about 110 pounds.
When no word came from NCSO by 6:30 a.m. Saturday morning, the caretaker called asking if something could be done to get air support involved in a search for the women.

An NCSO dispatcher, only identified as “Lori,” answered the call. She said, “We can’t tell California what to do to get involved.” There was no mention of calling Nye County Search and Rescue. Asked what could be done by an individual, she gave a list of phone numbers including Death Valley National Park Ranger Station, Inyo County Sheriff’s Office and California Highway Patrol.
The calls were made. None of the agencies had any of the details other than the “be on the lookout” released by NCSO the evening before. No alarm had been raised.

A return phone call came from Inyo County Deputy Richards who listened to the details and said he was heading to the ranger station in Death Valley to see what could be done. He said air support was likely and promised to be in touch within the next couple of hours. It was 10 a.m., and the temperatures in Death Valley would reach 128 degrees.

At noon on Saturday, tense family members and friends learned California officials were in action. Two aircraft from Victorville had been dispatched to start searching Death Valley. A helicopter from one of the Air Force bases in California, it was hoped, would join the search. Three teams of Special Forces were on the ground searching the back country — those trained to withstand the harsh environment and lend help to those who might succumb.

Financial information about Cooper’s credit cards was obtained online by her daughter in Florida who reported to Deputy Richards only two transactions on Thursday, one for fuel and one for tickets to Scotty’s Castle. Wherever they were, the women were without food or water. It was 2 p.m. They had been missing for 49 hours.

With California aircraft and DVNP employees, deputies and dispatchers from Inyo County all working together, it would still take five hours, and, according to CHP Pilot Scott Steele, one final pass over an area miles from Scotty’s Castle to find the missing women.

It was 5 p.m. Saturday when the call came from California Highway Patrol that the women had been found. A CHP helicopter had spotted the car on a deserted stretch of dirt road.
Although Cooper was, according to Steele, 128 miles from Scotty’s Castle, she had traveled over 400 miles on the unmarked system of trails in Death Valley and run out of gas.

Cooper said she had GPS onboard, and tried to use it. “It kept telling me to go one mile and turn either right or left on Saline Valley Road.” Cooper said she never saw a road sign and sometimes she’d go one mile and there was no turn at all.

Cooper said by the time the fuel light came on in her Hyundai Accent, she had traveled so many miles there was no turning back. So she kept going forward hoping to come out of the desolation to “a paved road leading somewhere.”

“It didn’t happen,” Cooper said. “When the car stopped the first night, we were in relatively little shade, but it was late and we slept in the car.

“At that point we had three-quarters of a bottle of water between us.”
Gina Cooper took a two-mile hike the next morning to see if she could get above the rocks and see some sign of life to which the group could walk. Her report — desert and more desert.
Cooper decided they had to move to another location. It was starting to get hot.
“It was a miracle when the car started, and even more of a miracle when we got turned around and back-tracked 45 miles on a below-empty tank of gas,” she said.

The car came to a stop at a cluster of trees Cooper said she remembered having passed. Having no other choice in the scorching heat, the group made an “X” in the road behind the disabled car out of two found poles, four big rocks and Gina Cooper’s San Francisco 49ers bandana used as a spot of red in the cross. They wrote “Help Us” and “Please Call Police” across the rear of the car, and walked into shelter offered by the trees.

“The road was so hot it was burning my feet through my shoes,” said Cooper.
“What we found was amazing. There in the middle of nowhere were three trailers, a screened sleeping porch and a couple of storage containers.
“There was no one around, and needing any kind of help we could get, we peeked into the window of one of the trailers and saw a two-way radio on the table.” The women proceeded to try the doors and windows until finally, a screen opened far enough to allow Leung to slip through and open the door for the others.

They never did get the radio working but they found something much more important — water — and food. “We turned on the faucets and hot water came out of both of them. It didn’t matter. It was water,” Cooper said.

At 5 p.m. Saturday, a noise captured Leung’s attention and going outside she was thrilled to see a helicopter making circles over the property. Grabbing a yellow blanket and waving it frantically, she screamed for Cooper who was inside.

“When I came out to see what she was yelling about — well — I’ve never seen anything so beautiful in all my life as that helicopter. I could see the CHP on the bottom of it and knew we’d been found,” said Cooper with tears in her eyes.

As it turned out, Cooper was on Saline Valley Road and had never seen a road sign anywhere.
The group was airlifted to the California Highway Patrol office at Lone Pine, to fill out a report and make arrangements to get fuel.

“They put us in touch with a guy named ‘Lizard’ Lee,” said Cooper. “Apparently he lives in the desert and keeps extra fuel somewhere. He brought enough gas to give me three-quarters of a tank and met us back at the car.”

Cooper and the girls pulled into her Pahrump driveway at 3 a.m. Sunday morning — safe and sound.

“We are more grateful than words can ever express,” said Cooper. “And to Marilyn Moyer and Peder Samuelson, of Atherton, Calif., who own the property where we stopped, you saved our lives. Thank you so much.”

The one thing she asks of Death Valley National Park is to mark every road at every intersection — it could save a life.
__________________

__________________
... Charlie
EV-2 build is now complete, (yeah right).
KZ6T
charlie56 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-28-2010, 12:07 PM   #2
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Carmel Valley, CA
Posts: 634
Send a message via AIM to Skywagon
Re: Lost and found in Death Valley

How about: Get a map and learn how to read it. Fill your car with gas. Take a bunch of water and food. Tell someone where you're going. Etc., etc., etc... Maybe stay out of Death Valley when it's 120 deg. . Maybe stop at the Common Sense Store on you way in.
Bill
__________________

__________________
2008 RB 50 Pueblo gold, Diesel, 4X4, Aluminess
NO2B
Skywagon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-28-2010, 01:48 PM   #3
Senior Member
 
scatter's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Blairsden, CA (when not on the road)
Posts: 1,053
Re: Lost and found in Death Valley

Quote:
Originally Posted by Skywagon
How about: Get a map and learn how to read it. Fill your car with gas. Take a bunch of water and food. Tell someone where you're going. Etc., etc., etc... Maybe stay out of Death Valley when it's 120 deg. . Maybe stop at the Common Sense Store on you way in.
Bill
Amen -
__________________
Scatter
You can be anything you want on the Internet,
it amazes me that so many choose stupid....

2007 RB50, 6.0
K1WGB
scatter is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-28-2010, 02:27 PM   #4
Senior Member
 
Viejo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Arcata, CA
Posts: 617
Re: Lost and found in Death Valley

Amen again to what Skywagon said. Plus - The GPS is just a tool, useless if you don't know how to use it. Just because the GPS says "Drive off the cliff" is a poor reason to do so.
__________________
2002 E350 7.3 PSD
Quigley 4x4, EB50 floorplan
Viejo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-28-2010, 04:37 PM   #5
Site Team
 
daveb's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Turlock Ca
Posts: 9,391
Garage
Re: Lost and found in Death Valley

GPS units often use any roadway to get you to the destination in "a short as possible route" as a rule. In a place like DV, a GPS similar to the Garmin I own can take you down a path where four wheel drive is required and cars shouldn't be. Lucky they didn't bury the car in the middle of a heat pit that offers no cover. Maps and knowing how to use them is priceless. Even a AAA map would have worked.
__________________
2006 Ford 6.0PSD EB-50/E-PH SMB 4X4 Rock Crawler Trailer

Sportsmobile 4X4 Adventures..........On and off road adventures
daveb is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-28-2010, 09:18 PM   #6
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Helena, Montana
Posts: 613
Re: Lost and found in Death Valley

Good gad... What a crazy story.

As a professional geographer-geographic information specialist-cartographer I only use a GPS to tell me where I'm at; not where to go. People trust digital devices waaaaaayyyyy tooo much to get them out of trouble. Hell, I don't trust my own maps always to get myself out of trouble.
__________________
2006 Baja Tan SMB 4X4 EB50 PH 6LPSD
Mohawk Royalex Solo 14 foot canoe (light white-water)
Mad River Kevlar Explorer 17 foot canoe (flat water)
Dagger Royalex Legend 16 foot canoe (white-water)
Maravia New Wave 13.5 foot raft (fishing and white-water)
Ed in Montana is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-28-2010, 10:13 PM   #7
Senior Member
 
MikewTV's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Garrison, NY
Posts: 217
Send a message via AIM to MikewTV
Re: Lost and found in Death Valley

I literally never got lost until age 42. That was the year I started using a GPS. It can make you clueless if you let it. I always used to know where I was because I studied it first. GPS can encourage ya to head out without a sense of where you are going or where you've been. Though that was only one of the mistakes in this case. Still, of course, it's wonderful that they are okay.
__________________
Mike W
Pueblo Gold Ford EB 350 v10 with EB 50 floor plan & Quigley 4x4 from Huntington (aka: Minerva)
MikewTV is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-29-2010, 11:35 AM   #8
Senior Member
 
spomo1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Kirkland WA
Posts: 125
Re: Lost and found in Death Valley

Take a map, a compass and a GPS. I carry two, my Garmin car mount and personal hand held. The car mount isn't much good if you have to walk out.If you don't know where you're going any map will get you there.. if you don't know where you are every map is useless. Plus, if you're going into the back country, take an EPIRB or a PLB. Makes the job a LOT easier for the search and resuce air wing to find you.

If you think it wont happen to you.. read 'Deep Survival' by Gonzales.. real stories about real people who survived 'it will never happen to me'
spomo1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-30-2010, 07:28 PM   #9
Senior Member
 
Roonie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: PNW WA
Posts: 618
Re: Lost and found in Death Valley

I don't think wilderness should be safe...... it is the price of admission. You have to know your sh*t if you want to go out in it. It is definately no Disney ride.

Interesting article however....

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/08/27/op...roll.html?_r=1
Roonie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-30-2010, 09:47 PM   #10
Site Team
 
daveb's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Turlock Ca
Posts: 9,391
Garage
Re: Lost and found in Death Valley

Quote:
Originally Posted by Roonie
I don't think wilderness should be safe...... it is the price of admission. You have to know your sh*t if you want to go out in it. It is definately no Disney ride.

Interesting article however....

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/08/27/op...roll.html?_r=1
Well this almost deserves its own thread.

I have mixed feelings about some wilderness areas. I feel public lands should be accessible to most everybody...in some aspect. At the same time, jerks need to be kept out and the majority of the wilderness probably needs to be protected. Extreme sports have their place, but the wilderness areas need to be regulated IMO. Even backpackers do beau coup damage.

From the other side I would like to see special sponsored sport and vehicle trips through some areas that have been closed to that type travel. Driving or riding is a privilege, so make it a lottery type event in a regulated event. In fragile areas, I think the masses have to be controlled but not totally cut off, especially if road(s) existed in the region at one time or another.

In the 70's I didn't have to worry about leaving my camp with the fear of a human ripping me off....well at least in the Sierra’s. I worried more about the stupid bears, but seeing a Coors can in a pristine creek at 12,000 feet flat sucked and if you’re that kind of person…well you don’t need to be there in the first place.
I wish I could have found the owner of that can and shoved it up their...

I’m not advocating cutting off areas to public access. Moderation (and maybe some control) is the key.

Rant over.

Back on Charlie’s topic.

I think those folks just screwed up and had no intention of going off road. It doesn’t sound like they were explorers, just a couple of people out for a drive thinking their GPS device was taking them down a nice little backcountry road.
__________________

__________________
2006 Ford 6.0PSD EB-50/E-PH SMB 4X4 Rock Crawler Trailer

Sportsmobile 4X4 Adventures..........On and off road adventures
daveb is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off

Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v3.2.3

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 03:53 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.