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Old 08-02-2019, 03:40 PM   #1
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Replacing tie-rod/tie-rod ends/drag link

I am planning on replacing my 2009 E350 2wd steering components (tie-rod, tie-rod end, tie-rod end adjusting sleeve & drag link). Looking underneath, it looks pretty straight forward to replace. Are there any special tools needed to swap out all the components? I plan on measuring the threads (on the adjusting sleeve) to get a close enough measurement to make it down for an alignment. Is there anything else that I should replace or be aware of?
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Old 08-02-2019, 04:56 PM   #2
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Here's my write-up from years ago re: my 2006 SMB. I hope it helps.

http://www.sportsmobileforum.com/for...ends-1995.html


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Old 08-03-2019, 09:53 AM   #3
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Thank you for the link BroncoHauler!
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Old 08-03-2019, 12:45 PM   #4
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I too appreciate the direction - Even though my FE is still in good shape I've convinced myself to replace all the critical components early 2020 so all this info will come in handy for the shop tackling mine.
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Old 08-20-2019, 02:57 PM   #5
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Does anyone know if you HAVE to replace the tie-rod end adjusting sleeves? Can I reuse the factory ones or should I replace with moog's (Replacing all oem parts with moog's parts steering component wise).
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Old 08-21-2019, 05:20 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hermosadae View Post
Does anyone know if you HAVE to replace the tie-rod end adjusting sleeves? Can I reuse the factory ones or should I replace with moog's (Replacing all oem parts with moog's parts steering component wise).
I'd recommend using the new Moog's but you can make that determination once you have everything ready to re-assemble. Honestly for their small price I'd change them---they're not known to have failure rates of any sort.

I would coat the tie rod ends with an anti-seize before assembly as those tend to rust-weld themselves together over time making toe-in adjustment at best difficult.

Also here's a good video I watched on YouTube about the adjusting sleeves and how they're properly installed. You're welcome to watch it from beginning to end but it all begins to be most helpful starting at about 3:20 in.

HTH
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Old 08-21-2019, 02:17 PM   #7
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I'd recommend using the new Moog's but you can make that determination once you have everything ready to re-assemble. Honestly for their small price I'd change them---they're not known to have failure rates of any sort.

I would coat the tie rod ends with an anti-seize before assembly as those tend to rust-weld themselves together over time making toe-in adjustment at best difficult.

I second the use of Moog parts, and to do the 'whole enchilada' with new parts. I've found it's not worth trying to mix-n-matching when working on American Iron, the stuff is usually rusted together, sometimes threads vary, the additional $ is just not worth the aggravation.


I saw a great tip on one of the cable car shows... remove the entire tie rod assembly at the knuckles as a unit. Assemble the new parts on the floor next to the greasy worn out old assembly. Assemble and pre-adjust the new parts using a tape measure, counting threads from the ends, get the new assembly close to the old one's length before you install it.



That way you can bolt it up and have it close enough to drive to the alignment shop, where you let the pros handle the rest.
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Old 08-21-2019, 02:36 PM   #8
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Thanks guys for your input, I'll be replacing everything to avoid headaches.
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Old 08-22-2019, 05:28 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TomsBeast View Post
I saw a great tip on one of the cable car shows... remove the entire tie rod assembly at the knuckles as a unit. Assemble the new parts on the floor next to the greasy worn out old assembly. Assemble and pre-adjust the new parts using a tape measure, counting threads from the ends, get the new assembly close to the old one's length before you install it.
Not a bad approach at all, especially if this is a drive way project.
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