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Old 08-09-2017, 11:08 PM   #11
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Originally Posted by bet on black View Post
when we rolled our van last month, the only person injured was my son, who was lying down on the 3rd row bench, with no belt on. when we flipped, it must have slammed him against the roof, as he ended up with a compression fracture in his spine. he will always wear a belt now. luckily he is on his way to full recovery, but he is also 17 and not as fragile as smaller ones. careful with those kiddos in the van, and make sure they are restrained properly.
BonB! Good to read/see you posting! Haven't been on in awhile and glad to hear your boy is mending/doing well!!!
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Old 08-10-2017, 09:49 AM   #12
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BonB! Good to read/see you posting! Haven't been on in awhile and glad to hear your boy is mending/doing well!!!
he helped me lay about 400 sq ft of wood flooring last night without any complaining, so i'd say he is ok!
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Old 08-10-2017, 10:17 AM   #13
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I would recommend keeping the kids in chairs with belts! But if that doesn't work, get a proper racing web harness.. like the ones you see in Nascar. They can be made in any size. But then you have to install some type of secure mounting system for the nets.. A highschooler hurtling through the air at 60mph creates a lot of force.
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Old 08-10-2017, 12:25 PM   #14
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That cargo net above is a great idea for cargo. Because you don't want heavy things hurtling at you, even when there isn't a rollover. But I'll add my two cents here from dealing with MVA patients in Emergency Rooms:

It's obvious, but I'll reiterate anyway: the reason seatbelts are designed the way they are is because they restrain the body at its most-likely regions to bend/pivot/propel. With the exception of the neck, we're mostly protected from these things, especially in rollovers, but also both rear and front collisions.

When a car is suddenly stopped, or pushed forward at speed, our musculoskeletal system is inadequate to keep us aligned. So, even if a human (or animal, for that matter) were restrained from propelling all the way forward via a cargo net, the body contorts in ways that can paralyze you, or kill you, due to extreme forces of propulsion on the spine and attending nerves.

Sorry to get all technical, but I really squirm when I hear folks wanting to bypass the designed restraints. Yeah, sure, we all rode in the "back-back" of station wagons or the bed of a pickup and yeah, we're still here. But lots of people aren't. I know we want our kids to be able to sleep while we drive - it's so quiet, right? But I can tell you from professional experience that the last thing you ever want to deal with is the guilt of a paralyzed or dead child. And don't get me started on dogs. Do you know what an 80-lb lab looks like going through a windshield?

Damn! I just read this over and I'm all doom and gloom. But it's all real, folks. Please find a way to have your kids and dogs belted in. There's a reason we generally don't die or become paralyzed in MVAs anymore, despite many more people on the roads and faster speeds. I care about you and want your lives to be full of fun and joy as we pursue our love of adventuring.

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Old 08-10-2017, 12:38 PM   #15
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That cargo net above is a great idea for cargo. Because you don't want heavy things hurtling at you, even when there isn't a rollover. But I'll add my two cents here from dealing with MVA patients in Emergency Rooms:



It's obvious, but I'll reiterate anyway: the reason seatbelts are designed the way they are is because they restrain the body at its most-likely regions to bend/pivot/propel. With the exception of the neck, we're mostly protected from these things, especially in rollovers, but also both rear and front collisions.



When a car is suddenly stopped, or pushed forward at speed, our musculoskeletal-skeletal system is inadequate to keep us aligned. So, even if a human (or animal, for that matter) were restrained from propelling all the way forward via a cargo net, the body contorts in ways that can paralyze you, or kill you, due to extreme forces of propulsion on the spine and attending nerves.



Sorry to get all technical, but I really squirm when I hear folks wanting to bypass the designed restraints. Yeah, sure, we all rode in the "back-back" of station wagons or the bed of a pickup and yeah, we're still here. But lots of people aren't. I know we want our kids to be able to sleep while we drive - it's so quiet, right? But I can tell you from professional experience that the last thing you ever want to deal with is the guilt of a paralyzed or dead child. And don't get me started on dogs. Do you know what an 80-lb lab looks like going through a windshield?



Damn! I just read this over and I'm all doom and gloom. But it's all real, folks. Please find a way to have your kids and dogs belted in. There's a reason we generally don't die or become paralyzed in MVAs anymore, despite many more people on the roads and faster speeds. I care about you and want your lives to be full of fun and joy as we pursue our love of adventuring.



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Thank you for the post.


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Old 08-10-2017, 09:36 PM   #16
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Originally Posted by bet on black View Post
he helped me lay about 400 sq ft of wood flooring last night without any complaining, so i'd say he is ok!
tell him he's a bad ass! Man will he have some stories for his peers when he goes back to school...he'll be the coolest!!
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Old 08-10-2017, 10:12 PM   #17
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Otter,

Thanks. That needed to be said. This is a reality that should never be sugar coated.
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Old 08-11-2017, 06:52 AM   #18
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Agree with Otter, and some of what he mentioned is also why I never wanted the sideways gaucho for passenger seating. Too many strange dynamics on your body if there's an accident, even if wearing a seatbelt.


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Old Today, 11:34 AM   #19
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Beside what has already been said, two things come to my mind:

1) Whatever you bolt your seat belts to, make sure there is a strong 'load path' that anchors to the belt to the van body. Case and point; Using 7/16" grade 8 bolts and 2" diameter backing washers to attach your seatbelt to a plywood folding bed might made you feel good. But will do you no good if the furniture is fastened to the floor with self-tapping sheetmetal screws and cute little hardware store L brackets. In a serious accident, you'd just find yourself flopping around the inside of the van with an upholstered piece of plywood strapped to your ass. No bueno.

2) Avoid accidents at all cost; take rest breaks, no alcohol for several hours before driving, slow it down on the ice and snow. Learn how your van reacts to sudden loss of traction in a snowy empty parking lot. Practice the 'quick lane change' on both wet and dry surfaces. Practice offroad driving close to home, get the feel for how your van reacts to tipping. "The best way to survive an accident, to not get in one in the first place" said the Capt. Obvious Award Winner.
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