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Old 03-07-2018, 10:22 AM   #1
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2010 E350 Pitman Arm?

My goal is to find a pitman that is 2" longer by 2" drop.
I've found 4"x4" drop arms but that is too much and would put my steering below the I-beams.

Anybody know a part number for a 2x2 drop pitman arm that is 36spline?

Thanks
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Old 03-07-2018, 11:33 AM   #2
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When I was looking into this, I discovered a few things that might help.
1) Depending on who and when my steering box was made, made a difference between fitting and not. I did some trial and error fitment, same number of splines but subtle difference of as little as .015" in diameter makes all the difference. Luckily my local 4x4 builder advised me they run into this everyday, had some options for me to try and return as needed.
2) In my case, interference with the frame rail at driver's side full steering lock was an issue, check that out before ordering a new pitman arm.
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Old 03-07-2018, 04:56 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TomsBeast View Post
When I was looking into this, I discovered a few things that might help.
1) Depending on who and when my steering box was made, made a difference between fitting and not. I did some trial and error fitment, same number of splines but subtle difference of as little as .015" in diameter makes all the difference. Luckily my local 4x4 builder advised me they run into this everyday, had some options for me to try and return as needed.
2) In my case, interference with the frame rail at driver's side full steering lock was an issue, check that out before ordering a new pitman arm.
That's exactly the issue I'm having right now.
I found a 36 spline off a 1999 Excursion that was 1" longer with a 1 1/2" drop but the spline part is bigger..... (This is one thing I hate about Fords, always changed stuff between vehicles, Chevy was smart in that aspect!)
Rough Country has one they swear will work but it's the 4"x4" and I that will be too low, and most likely hit the frame like you say...

I'd call Action Vans and ask what they use for a drop pitman arm but I'd feel like a douche since I didn't buy their lift for my van...
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Old 09-20-2019, 10:38 AM   #4
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Ever find a solution to this?

I'm currently running a Weldtec 4" lift, and considering replacing the pitman arm to address bump steer issues. Did you ever find a drop pitman arm to fit the bill? Did it help smooth things out with your van?

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Old 09-20-2019, 11:57 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by killacks View Post
Ever find a solution to this?

I'm currently running a Weldtec 4" lift, and considering replacing the pitman arm to address bump steer issues. Did you ever find a drop pitman arm to fit the bill? Did it help smooth things out with your van?

It didn’t work. I didn’t realize Ford used so many steering boxes and different spline counts. I did add a steering stabilizer on it and that took a lot of bump steer out of it.
Bracket I used was:

Ford F2UZ-3E652-A - BRKT-STNG SHK... https://www.amazon.com/dp/B000O0MPFO...p_mob_ap_share

There’s pre existing holes in the frame for this bracket, you just need to tap them, for the connection on the steering arm I just got one from the junkyard for $5

This is the stabilizer I used:

Monroe SC2955 Magnum Steering Damper https://www.amazon.com/dp/B000C59SCE...p_mob_ap_share
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Old 09-20-2019, 01:08 PM   #6
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Ok. Thanks for the info.

Well, I guess there's no easy fix, then. I'm running the Weldtec stabilizer already. Have also gone through a laundry list of things to address vibration-feeling, eventually coming to the latest conclusion, that it's likely bump steer.

My mechanic is actually researching my same question as we speak. I'll post again if something useful comes to light
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Old 09-20-2019, 01:59 PM   #7
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If you have a ball joint Dana 60 straight axle, take look at the ‘high steer modification’ That’s what I wound up doing, I’m very happy with the ‘difference between night and day’ results.
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Old 09-20-2019, 02:02 PM   #8
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A dropped pitman arm with bent beams (Like Camburg and Weldtec) will make bumpsteer WORSE since it will move the steering linkages upper pivot further away from the I-beam's (factory) upper pivot, and further from being parrallel to the I-beams. It's only appropriate to use a dropped pitman arm when also using drop brackets of the same amount for the I-beam pivots (like Action Van.)

The problem is that the stock steering linkage is unequal in length, relative to the I-beam on the side of the vehicle that a given tie rod serves. Because of this, as the suspension cycles, your toe setting will change, drastically more on one side than the other (go look how short the driver's side tierod is compared to the driver's I-beam.)

I'm a little surprised this doesn't come up more often since every 2wd e-series suffers from it, lifted or not. Some drivers just have a higher tolerance for vague or "loose" steering. If you image search "crossover steering I beam" you'll see the proper way to correct the piss-poor factory steering geometry is a total redesign, anything less is a bandaid. Each tie rod needs to exactly the same length as the I-beam it serves, as well as being parrallel to it. That's easier said than done when you consider that they have to cross paths with each other and work with a steering box that's in a "fixed" location. It won't be bolt-on, and it won't be cheap, but any offroad fab shop that's worth a darn should be able to make it happen. I've kicked the idea around often, but have a hard time justifying the effort/cost. Paying a shop is likely to cost +/-$2k. What's it worth to you?

A steering stabilizer is nothing more than a shock absorber for your steering. It does NOTHING to correct the mechanical bumpsteer caused by bad geometry. That's not to say that they don't serve a purpose, but that purpose is to soften the blow from an impact that is not perpindicular to your tire's direction of travel.

Edit: In case it was not obvious, all of the above only applies to Twin I-beam 2wd or Twin Traction Beam 4wd only, not solid axles... that's another long winded can of worms.
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