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Old 02-25-2019, 05:31 PM   #1
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Replacing coil packs

Was replacing the rest of the coil packs today on my 2002 5.4L. Ran into two problems that I need some help with.

1. What is the easiest way to access the coil pack on number 2 cylinder, from the front or the rear of the engine? It looks very tight to get my hand in there either way.

2. The screw that holds the number 5 coil pack in place does not want to back out. It is holding the coil packtight to its mounting point. It rotates with a ratchet but does not unscrew. Anyone run into this before?
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Old 02-26-2019, 04:53 AM   #2
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Technically the #2 cylinder would be passenger side just behind the very front plug and COP. On my three 5.4's that's one of the easier ones to access although it might require temporarily moving a few heater or vacuum hoses out of the way. I remove the entire air cleaner assembly, sometimes from the throttle body forward which results in an unbelievable amount of room. The only tools needed are 7mm & 8mm sockets for the various bolts and clamps holding the intake air ducting together. If you go this route remember to disconnect the MAF sensor connector found on the bottle of the air filter housing.

Here's the 5.4 cylinder numbering scheme:



A COP bolt that turns but doesn't back out means the brass insert pressed into the plastic intake manifold has "stripped" and turning with the bolt. I can't help with any usable advice how to remove it all at this point but when it is out a thorough cleaning and degreasing of the hole along with some JB Weld should be enough to hold the COP to the intake well enough for many more miles.

One word of caution with the JB Weld or any adhesive for this repair: make very, VERY sure you install the proper bolt coated with a lubricant to prevent the adhesive from seeping onto the bolt threads and locking that irreversibly onto the brass insert.

I also use a dab of anti-seize on the COP bolts whenever they're out for anything. Any one that shows signs of even the smallest damage or resist coming out are are replaced with Ford parts---not cheap but much less costly than a new intake.
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Old 02-26-2019, 01:15 PM   #3
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Thanks for the tips JWA. Got number 2 changed this morning. It took longer than the others. If I was going to do it again I would remove number 1 then remove and replace 2 and then install number 1. Likewise with 3 and 4. It also helped to remove the injector electrical plugs to get more finger room in the bolt area and to grab the coil. The ones on the drivers side have more access so they are easier to remove.

Of the seven I took out only two came out with the boot attached. Had to reach in with a pair of pliers to pull the old boot out. They did not want to release.

It was about 35F when I was doing this so I started the engine and let it warm up. The radiated heat from the engine kept my fingers warm and leaning over the radiator kept the rest of me cozy as well.

Think I will talk with my mechanic to see if he wants to figure out how to change number 5.
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Old 08-11-2019, 02:39 PM   #4
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What's the socket size for the actual bolt holding down the coil pack? I'm attempting to replace the #2 coil pack tomorrow and hoping the bolt is not stripped.
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Old 08-11-2019, 03:04 PM   #5
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I believe it's 7mm?
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Old 08-11-2019, 06:30 PM   #6
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Originally Posted by TheLetterJ View Post
I believe it's 7mm?
Yup.

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Old 08-11-2019, 08:13 PM   #7
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Thank you TheLetterJ for the info.
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Old 08-11-2019, 10:17 PM   #8
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What's the socket size for the actual bolt holding down the coil pack? I'm attempting to replace the #2 coil pack tomorrow and hoping the bolt is not stripped.
I would be more worried about the bolt being frozen to the threads. If they are it is possible to damage the intake manifold that the threads are pressed into. If the damage the intake manifold solution is to either replace the manifold or epoxy the threads back into the manifold.

Bottom line is be careful. To much leverage is you enemy.
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Old 08-12-2019, 04:56 AM   #9
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Originally Posted by larrie View Post
I would be more worried about the bolt being frozen to the threads. If they are it is possible to damage the intake manifold that the threads are pressed into. If the damage the intake manifold solution is to either replace the manifold or epoxy the threads back into the manifold.

Bottom line is be careful. To much leverage is you enemy.
Correct---all of the above. Every time I remove a COP bolt successfully I'll use a dab of aluminum anti-seize or dielectric grease is applied to the threads. When tightening them I use a 1/4" drive hand ratchet only---there's no need to crank them down to some insane torque value. Using the hand tool and lubricant helps avoid cross threading which can cause the brass insert to loosen and no longer hold the COP tight against the spark plug.

As Larrie says the COP bolt threads are pressed or heated and then installed in the plastic intake. Long time between plug changes or heavy handed installation is the main culprit when those inserts become a problem. Replacing the intake is one way to do it but if you're able to remove the bolt and insert without damaging the intake you can re-install the inserts like this:



FWIW the COP bolt thread is M5 x0.8 pitch.

You can also use Loc-Tite's thread repair system which is suitable if done correctly.

Removing a spinning COP bolt would require drilling the head with a large enough bit to eliminate the entire bolt head. The OEM bolt with integral flange or washer is about 11MM or 13/16" in diameter. You could also CAREFULLY cut the COP mounting tab off to remove the coll and deal with the bolt and insert at that point. Naturally this would necessitate replacing the COP--use nothing but Motorcraft please.

Here's two photos of the COP's as they'd appear installed:



With bolt in place:



If drilling the head away drill use increasingly larger holes to help center the largest bit required to remove the COP without damage to its case.

So that's what I know---hope its helpful.
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