Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 12-31-2017, 03:10 PM   #1
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2017
Posts: 3
V10 Spark Plug issue

Hello Sportsmobile folks. I am new to the forum. About a year ago I bought a 1999 Ford E350 Sportsmobile with the V10. The van has 160K miles. I know that my van had a spark plug blow out somewhere between 129K and 137K based on the maintenance records. All 10 plugs were replaced at that time, along with the repair to the threads on the one cylinder that blew. I donít know exactly what that repair was, but I assume it had to be the installation of an insert. I canít tell from the records which insert was used (smaller or larger), whether anti seize was used on any of the plugs, or even what plugs were used. It was not the dealer that did the work.

I have read other raps here and on other Ford or Econoline sites where guys believed if the right torque was used when the plugs were installed, you should be fine. There seemed to be differing views on whether to use anti seize.

I really donít like that this problem is lurking out there. I read about and watched videos on the repair that can be done while the head is still in the van, but Iíd hate to be stuck doing that in the middle of the Maze.

I have considered removing the heads and having a machine shop install the large inserts in each of the 10 spark plug holes. Has anyone done this? Iím having trouble finding web info on whether the V10 heads can even be removed while the engine is in the van. Has anyone tried? Any info, wisdom, or thoughts would be greatly appreciated. Thanks very much.

Will
Colorado Springs.
__________________

Will - Colorado Springs is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-31-2017, 04:41 PM   #2
Senior Member
 
86Scotty's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: TN
Posts: 8,158
I think the problem is largely overblown on the internet. I certainly don't want to discount the fact that you are one of the few who had the problem but I don't really think it is as common as many think. What I would do is pull one or two of the plugs and see what condition they are in and what type they are. If they were replaced I'm sure they would've been replaced with the longer thread type, Ford's fix for the problem. I can't tell you which exact ones are the right ones but someone here or a Ford mechanic can. If yours were swapped I bet you got the better plugs and you'll probably be fine.

As far as anti-seize goes, I'm no expert but I've had lots of vehicles including several Ford vans and a couple V10s. I ALWAYS use anti-seize. I can't see how it would not be a good idea to use it on all plugs. It makes easier to get in and easier to get out. I've never had one that I put anti-seize on come loose.

You could probably find a lot more info on this issue and on the FTE (Ford Truck Enthusiasts) forum. There are lots of Ford gearheads there for sure.

Good luck!

__________________

__________________
Currently vanless. Weird.
86Scotty is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-01-2018, 08:37 AM   #3
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2017
Posts: 3
86Scotty -

Thanks very much for replying. I have several other things I'm fixing / upgrading so maybe I'll forget about the spark plug issue for now. Happy New Year!

Will
Will - Colorado Springs is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-02-2018, 06:50 AM   #4
JWA
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Reynoldsburg, Ohio
Posts: 2,163
Send a message via Yahoo to JWA
Scotty86 is pretty much spot-on about this issue---it is largely overblown and Ford criticized for this but with the millions of plug holes that DON'T blow out it's somewhat rare. For the most part the brand Time-Sert is highly, highly recommended for thread repair. There are many other brands but almost everyone who has used those correctly the repair is permanent. However if your engine has no issues at the moment there's no real need go through all the trouble to remove the heads for preventative thread repair. Like Scotty though that'll have be to your call in the end.

On the issue of removal and reinstalling plugs here's my recommendation..........

(Your engine should be the "older" style heads with 3.5 threads in the plug hole---this is incorrectly said to be the root cause of ejected spark plugs---its not.)

Before we get too deep into this its better to change plugs at 50K miles despite the idea they're still effective at 100K and above.

Use nothing but Motorcraft plugs spec'd for your year & engine. There is no advantage to using some whizz-bang gee whiz new-fangled overly hyped brand. They're designed and built to work on Ford engines, the PCM seems to love 'em and what's better than a trouble-free install? There is too much anecdotal info where a misfire with new plugs is related to another brand. Just as often these misfires are corrected by installing a Motorcraft plug.

Removal of the plugs especially after 50K miles can greatly affect the re-installation and longevity of plugs in the heads. There are recommended procedures IF issues with removal are encountered. Because this is almost as important as installation it pays to know what works best.

During installation I highly, highly recommend using a nickel-based anti-seize on the plug threads, torque set to 23-25 ft/lbs. (These heads have been tested in a casual manner by an FTE user in excess of 90 ft/lbs without any signs of stripped out plug holes. https://www.ford-trucks.com/forums/1...ead-heads.html

I've used the anti-seize and 23 ft/lbs technique over several 5.4 Modular Motors, some with much higher mileage than yours. Being careful costs nothing and can very well prevent a lot of problems.

One thing overlooked in plug changes is the boots from the COP's to the plug itself. If they're hard or stiff, show any signs of cracks or splits then they're cheap enough to warrant replacing with a quality part--I like NAPA/Belden's myself. Should a COP itself go bad the OEM's are superb quality, my 2000 with 285K miles is still running the originals. Again there's no benefit to some gee whizz brand promising improved this or that----the performance aspects are controlled by the PCM.

So anyway that's what I know----glad to answer anything if needed or wanted.
JWA is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-02-2018, 08:39 AM   #5
Senior Member
 
86Scotty's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: TN
Posts: 8,158
I agree with JWA on the plugs. I like the standard OEM or OEM equivalent. I've never liked Bosch plugs. I'm good with Motorcraft and they're cheap. I had a 5.4 Expedition with lots of misfires and COP issues. I got a big tube of dielectric grease and a set of COP boots, not the full COPs themselves, and pulled each plug, replaced with antiseize, tested the COP with a multimeter (Google it), and reassembled COPs with plenty of dielectric grease on both ends of the boot. I never had a problem again.

__________________
Currently vanless. Weird.
86Scotty is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-02-2018, 11:21 AM   #6
JWA
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Reynoldsburg, Ohio
Posts: 2,163
Send a message via Yahoo to JWA
Quote:
Originally Posted by 86Scotty View Post
I agree with JWA on the plugs. I like the standard OEM or OEM equivalent.

Great minds think alike!

I disagree just a bit about testing a COP with any sort of multi-meter----being that they're inductive by nature the only result you see is whether the primary coil is open or not.

There is another shade tree test but again that's not too effective past seeing if the COP is passing a current through its primary and secondary coils. The true condition of each spark plug as installed and engine running is with a scanner that produces a timeline of voltages though each plug.

I'm being a bit anal but that's my nature.
JWA is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-02-2018, 02:02 PM   #7
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2017
Posts: 3
Hey you guys -

Thanks very much for all the info and thoughts. Great forum.

Will
Will - Colorado Springs is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-15-2018, 09:40 AM   #8
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2017
Location: Colorado
Posts: 20
Thanks

I have an 2003 E-350 V10 that I had the same questions on. Thanks for the help/inout fellas. It's appreciated by this novice!
RingTheAlarm is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-15-2018, 09:54 AM   #9
Senior Member
 
boywonder's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: So Cal
Posts: 2,945
Quote:
Originally Posted by JWA View Post

(Your engine should be the "older" style heads with 3.5 threads in the plug hole---this is incorrectly said to be the root cause of ejected spark plugs---its not.)


So anyway that's what I know----glad to answer anything if needed or wanted.
What year did the change to "newer style" heads occur??
__________________
2008 E350 RB passenger 4WD SMB penthouse
2013 KTM 350 EXC
2008 KTM 250 XCF-W
2000 KTM 200 EXC
2003 Honda Element
boywonder is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-15-2018, 10:31 AM   #10
Member
 
longboardguy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Costa Mesa, CA
Posts: 35
November 2002

Good thread on the subject:

https://www.ford-trucks.com/forums/9...-blowouts.html

My early 2002 v10 with original plugs blew 1 plug out at 120k. Faint ticking sound first, then engine warning light came, then it blew.
__________________

__________________
2006 e350 EB Quigley V10 Gas Daily Driver
Fiberine 24" high top
Home Build interior, 200w solar, 42 Gal fresh water
46 gal Transferflow tank, Agile RIP kit
longboardguy is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off

Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v3.2.3
Disclaimer:

This website is not affiliated with or endorsed by Sportsmobile SIP or any of its affiliates. This is an independent, unofficial site.


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 03:43 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.