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Old 01-09-2018, 07:24 PM   #1
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Another Fridge Question Thread

I've read a bunch of threads on refridgerators but none really answer my questions. I've been trying to find some details on mainly Truckfridge TF65 and the Indel Drawer 65 INOX:

-What capacity/dimensions are the fridge vs the freezer sections. The local RV shops only have the large, uh, RV fridges so I haven't been able to get hands on. Trying to figure out if they are big enough to hold a weeks worth of food. I've been using a 60-quart cooler packed with large ice blocks (1.36L jug and some regular water bottles frozen solid) which seems to work okay, but other than that I have no frame of reference for these.

-Will the freezer in either of these actually freeze something, or will they just keep frozen things frozen? I mainly want use the freezer for making ice cubes and the occasional long term steak storage.

-Has anybody used the Indel drawer fridges? They are pricey, but I like the drawer idea. Truckfridges are well represented in the threads I've found here.

-If my search skills just suck feel free to point me in the right direction.

Thanks
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Old 01-09-2018, 08:25 PM   #2
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For the Truckfridge, scroll down this page to the questions section and look at several answers for the 3rd question:

https://www.amazon.com/TruckFridge-T.../dp/B01J0WQ566

Sorry, that's all I could find.
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Old 01-09-2018, 09:06 PM   #3
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I don't have a fridge yet but I use dry ice. I bought two bricks and it kept our pre made food frozen for a week on our Yellowstone trip. Just a thought
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Old 01-09-2018, 10:00 PM   #4
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Originally Posted by Phish View Post
I don't have a fridge yet but I use dry ice. I bought two bricks and it kept our pre made food frozen for a week on our Yellowstone trip. Just a thought
Is the box vented to the outside? Dry ice is frozen Carbon Dioxide. At regular atmospheric pressure it sublimates directly from solid to gas. It does not poison you like Carbon Monoxide, but it can fill up a small van cabin, pushing oxygen out of the room, and make you suffocate without being aware anything is happening. If the box isn't vented to the outside, make sure you have some air circulation in the van, especially while sleeping. The stuff can kill you.
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Old 01-09-2018, 10:09 PM   #5
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We use it safely
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Old 01-10-2018, 07:32 AM   #6
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For your Truckfridge questions I would just call them directly. A real human being will pick right up.

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Old 02-15-2018, 06:50 PM   #7
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Can somebody tell me if these 12V fridges will freeze water or will they just keep frozen things frozen? Certainly at least that answer is lurking somewhere in the collective knowledge here.
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Old 02-15-2018, 07:54 PM   #8
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Can somebody tell me if these 12V fridges will freeze water or will they just keep frozen things frozen? Certainly at least that answer is lurking somewhere in the collective knowledge here.
physics generally dictate that if it is less than 32 degrees F.... water will freeze.



So to sum this all up, when matter is transitioning from solid to liquid (melting) or liquid to solid (freezing), its temperature is fixed at the melting/freezing point, which is the same temperature.
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Old 02-15-2018, 09:11 PM   #9
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It's my experience that I can freeze things that are room temp with my 12v fridges but it takes a long time and thus burns a lot of electricity. A lot of electricity being relative to my small 12v system. The stock van fridge is less possible but my tiny Engel that I use as a freezer will do it easier. I chose to not try unless power is really abundant. i.e. driving a long day or being plugged in, which is very rare for me.

Don't forget Latent Heat of Fusion from science camp. Going from 62* tap water, or chicken, to frozen solid isn't linear.

From a google search refresher.
Removing heat from one pound of water one Btu at a time will produce a linear result until the temperature of the water reaches 32F (0C). At the freezing point of water, it will require 144 Btus of latent heat to be removed in order to turn all the water into ice without any further drop in temperature, after which the ice will be sub-cooled.

This is the Latent Heat of Fusion of Water, and is 144 Btus per pound (or 334 joules (80 calories) per gram).

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Old 02-15-2018, 10:08 PM   #10
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Don't forget Latent Heat of Fusion
From a google search refresher.
Removing heat from one pound of water one Btu at a time will produce a linear result until the temperature of the water reaches 32F (0C). At the freezing point of water, it will require 144 Btu’s of latent heat to be removed in order to turn all the water into ice without any further drop in temperature, after which the ice will be sub-cooled.

This is the Latent Heat of Fusion of Water, and is 144 Btu’s per pound (or 334 joules (80 calories) per gram).

- Eric
OK, just a hair over 40 years since I taught physics, so digging deep for some recall here.

This is also known as the enthalpy of fusion. Let's take that one gram of water and start with it as ice at absolute zero (0K, -273.15C, -459.67F). It takes 0.5 calories per gram to elevate the temperature one degree Kelvin/Celsius up to 0C/+273.5K, which is the transition point between solid and liquid water at STP (standard temperature and pressure). So, that is approximately 137 calories to elevate the temperature from 0K to 273.15K (=0C=32F) We now have to pour 80 calories of heat into the ice to transition from solid to liquid, while remaining at a temperature of 0K. The reverse is true when changing from liquid water to solid ice; the same amount of heat must be removed.

Once the transition of state is achieved, it now takes 1 calorie of heat to raise the temperature for each one degree Kelvin. So, that is 100 calories to elevate the temperature of one gram of liquid water at 0C to 100C (32F to 212F). One hundred calories to go from liquid water at its freezing point to liquid water at its vaporization point. It now takes an astounding 540 calories just to change that same one gram of water from liquid to steam-steam in which the individual water molecules are at that same 100C/212F temperature. This is known as the enthalpy of vaporization.

Simply put, water does not like to change temperature, and it sure as hell does not like to change state. This is why most of costal California never gets extremely hot or extremely cold. Water doesn't like to change temperature and the ocean moderates temperature change both up and down right on the coast.

There is no such thing as a refrigerator/freezer which can keep frozen things frozen, but cannot change water to ice. If, however, the refrigerator does not have the ability to draw heat from a closed system rapidly, it can take a very long time to freeze something. So the questions becomes, how rapidly can a refrigerator/freezer remove heat from something containing water? It actually matters little whether the item you put in is 90F or 33F. It can get the item down to 32F pretty quickly. Getting the water inside to change from liquid at 32F to ice at 32F is what takes a lot of thermal sink, and if the refrigeration system is not very strong, also just takes a lot of time.
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