Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 12-29-2007, 05:26 PM   #1
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Helena, Montana
Posts: 613
You guys have to stop making a habit of this. It's distressing to watch.

Both sets of snowy towing pictures bring up another SMB question. In mid-February we have a Forest Service cabin near Glacier National Park, and I'm debating driving the SMB there, rather than our Honda Element. The 4X4 SMB can handle the deeper snow (the roads may be unplowed) but might not handle ice as well as the all wheel drive Element. The Element has fairly little ground clearance if we do have significant new snow.

But I was reading the diesel info while fueling up the SMB a week ago, and the mid-winter diesel is rated to -40 F. I have been near to that cabin when it was 40 below in February three years ago and it was really, really interesting. Even the wine froze left in the car (at -19 degrees below F), but our old, and unfortunately gone, Subaru Forester started right up the next morning.

So the questions are: how does the SMB handle on solid ice (on a snowpacked gravel road) and has anyone had experience with the diesel at super below zero temps? I have started our beast up a couple of times at -5 below in our driveway and it coughed, sputtered and started.

The cabin has no electricity and is at least 60 miles from the nearest tow service, which I would like to avoid. I know this question is probably more appropriate for an episode of Ice Road Truckers
__________________

__________________
2006 Baja Tan SMB 4X4 EB50 PH 6LPSD
Mohawk Royalex Solo 14 foot canoe (light white-water)
Mad River Kevlar Explorer 17 foot canoe (flat water)
Dagger Royalex Legend 16 foot canoe (white-water)
Maravia New Wave 13.5 foot raft (fishing and white-water)
Ed in Montana is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-29-2007, 06:11 PM   #2
Senior Member
 
scatter's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Blairsden, CA (when not on the road)
Posts: 1,069
I don't have any experience in that degree of cold Ed. If you're even approaching 40 below I'd sure want preheat.
As far as handleing on ice, I've been fine. But, there's always been some snow or sand on top. Actually, it handled better (less sliding around) then the wife's 4Runner. Must be the extra weight as they both have the same BFG tires. If you make it back out of there, let us know how it went....
__________________

__________________
Scatter
You can be anything you want on the Internet,
it amazes me that so many choose stupid....

2007 RB50, 6.0
K1WGB
scatter is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-29-2007, 06:16 PM   #3
Senior Member
 
alta825's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Posts: 439
Garage
I can't comment on the diesel but I can comment on the snowpacked/icy roads and SMB's. We live about 2 miles up a dirt road that is plowed but not sanded/salted and is left snowpacked all winter. If the road is pretty flat it does great w/ all the weight but if it is like my road (@800-900 vertical ft gain in the 1.5-2 miles), you gotta be SUPER careful heading downhill, the approx 10,000 lbs may get great traction on the flats but watch out when its time to keep the speed under control, once that weight starts to slide it ain't gonna stop until it hits something bigger. Also, make sure you have chains and know how to use them.

I too, have an Element for my daily driver. Even though the ground clearance isn't much, w/ Nokian snows on it it is pretty much unstoppable in the winter. Its been a good little rig for us over the last few yrs. I will say that tone of the best winter rigs we have ever had is my wife's 05 4Runner Sport V8 which is fulltime 4wd. That thing kills it in the winter and all I have on it are Dueler A/T's

As much as I love driving the SMB, it is pretty much parked most of the winter unless we're heading out on a road trip and need the home away from home, too many yahwho's out here driving Rental cars to their ski condos w/ summer tires and UT loves to salt the roads beyond belief.

Anyway, have a fun and safe trip and enjoy the snow

Cheers,

-d
__________________
2002 EB51 7.3L w/ Stage 2- UJoint 6" 4x4 Conversion
2001 RB50 V10 Quigley- SOLD
alta825 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-29-2007, 07:02 PM   #4
Site Team
 
BroncoHauler's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Southern New Mexico
Posts: 8,943
At a minimum, you need a fuel conditioner that will keep the fuel from gelling. That said, those sorts of temps are hard on any vehicle, be it gas or diesel.

You mentioned no electricity, does that include no generator which you could run your engine block heater off of, assuming you have one.

Another option, just run the diesel all night long. Relatively minimal fuel usage for a diesel at idle. Also if would give you a sleeping are option with heat.


Herb
__________________
SMB-less as of 02/04/2012. Our savings account is richer, but our adventures are poorer.
BroncoHauler is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-30-2007, 01:50 PM   #5
Senior Member
 
geoffff's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Seattle, WA
Posts: 933
After the fuel pump repair, we did have a few days remaining of fun boondocking in the snow and tracking down hot springs. Nighttime temperature in eastern Oregon and northern Nevada was 12 to 24 degrees F. Our sink water pipes froze solid at those temperatures, and I think something cracked the 12 degree F night (there's now a drip near the tank when the water pump is on).

Otherwise camping in the cold is fun. Cooking and heavy blankets keep us warm. (no furnace or hot water heater)

The trails were all frozen solid mud, and traction was great.

-- Geoff
__________________
2004 Ford, SMB 4x4, RB-50
http://octopup.org/sportsmobile
geoffff is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-30-2007, 03:58 PM   #6
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Helena, Montana
Posts: 613
Herb: nope, no generator. The cabin has propane lights and a wood stove. And no engine block heater in the SMB. I asked Sportsmobile West about a block heater when we specked the vehicle a year and a half ago, but they said they didn't install them.

For a gas vehicle at below zero temps, I have always run the engine for a half hour or so before bed time (sleeping in the cabin not the vehicle) and run it again first thing in the morning. Hopefully it won't be that cold this coming February.

Thanks all for the cold weather advice, but I'm leaning to driving the Honda just to avoid the possiblility of the diesel SMB freezing solid at super below zero temps.
__________________
2006 Baja Tan SMB 4X4 EB50 PH 6LPSD
Mohawk Royalex Solo 14 foot canoe (light white-water)
Mad River Kevlar Explorer 17 foot canoe (flat water)
Dagger Royalex Legend 16 foot canoe (white-water)
Maravia New Wave 13.5 foot raft (fishing and white-water)
Ed in Montana is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-30-2007, 04:04 PM   #7
Site Team
 
BroncoHauler's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Southern New Mexico
Posts: 8,943
Ed, I've heard that all ford 6.0L have the block heater installed, but it's only the power cord that either comes with the block heater option, or not. I hear it's a item you can buy at your local Ford dealer and hook up yourself.


Herb
__________________
SMB-less as of 02/04/2012. Our savings account is richer, but our adventures are poorer.
BroncoHauler is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-30-2007, 07:38 PM   #8
Senior Member
 
PeasBugs's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Soquel, CA
Posts: 154
Ed - If your van is diesel it should have a block heater straight from Ford. I have seen some where the power cord is wrapped up behind the front bumper, or under the radiator, or even wrapped up and tied off somewhere else under the front part of the engine area.
__________________
2007 Sportsmobile EB-50 4X4 6.0 Diesel with extras
PeasBugs is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-30-2007, 08:04 PM   #9
Senior Member
 
JoeyNick's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: New "Yawk" City
Posts: 245
Cold Weather Starting

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bronco_hauler
Another option, just run the diesel all night long. Relatively minimal fuel usage for a diesel at idle.
Herb
My ScanGauge shows 0.5 to 0.6 gallons per hour at idle, in case you want to go this route.

The power cord for the block heater has been mentioned and you could also go with a synthetic oil to make winter starting easier. Synthetic oil tends to flow better than regular oil at low temperatures.

If you have a good remote starter, you can start the van every couple of hours to keep the engine relatively warm (my Viper alarm can be set to automatically start the van every 4 hours with a 20 minute run time.)

And finally, if it's really cold, make sure the batteries are fully charged and don't start the engine until the glow plugs have been on for a minute or more. The glow plugs will continue to heat long after the "wait to start" light has turned off.

Good luck!
__________________
2005 Ford E-350 Diesel Sportsmobile
EB 102 Voyager top, 3.55 rear, Mobil 1 all around
270 amp alternator, billet water pump, coolant filter kit,
aluminum radiator, X-Monitor with pyro, trans temp, boost
+ Scan Gauge & SCT Live Wire (Economy)
JoeyNick is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-30-2007, 09:49 PM   #10
Senior Member
 
Jammyauto's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: santa barbara
Posts: 229
My '05 6.0 has the factory heater. I did not ask for it. I think it's standard equipment.
__________________

__________________
Seth Hatfield
'05 EB350 6.0 4x4
Homebuilt Interior
Santa Barbara Ca
Jammyauto is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off

Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v3.2.3
Disclaimer:

This website is not affiliated with or endorsed by Sportsmobile SIP or any of its affiliates. This is an independent, unofficial site.


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 08:39 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
×