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Old 07-05-2019, 10:37 AM   #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by shenrie View Post
My curt front receiver is only rated for 9k.

Specs from etrailer.

Front Hitch Specs:
Custom Fit Hitch
Front Mount Hitch
Square Tube
500 lbs Vert Load
9000 lbs Line Pull
2 Inch Hitch
I'm no engineer but I believe hitches are engineered to withstand massive, occasional loads which are long and short forces on the center of the hitch.
This is opposed to the pull of a winch which is more or less steady. Also the placement of the winch plate angle mounts (closer to the frame rails) adds to the strength and I believe is more then sufficient.
As far as the mounting of the hitch to the frame (4biolts) or use the existing bumper mounts I really don't see the difference. If you feel it's not enough then just weld it.
Over the last 10 years I've used the hitch and later the winch many times, and a few times on rigs dead in the sand and never had a problem.
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Old 07-05-2019, 11:11 AM   #22
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Check your bolt rating, look at the head of the bolt, count ticks on bolt. 5 is usually the stronger rating for the bolt.
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Old 07-05-2019, 11:53 AM   #23
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Originally Posted by HIGHCOUNTRYMIKE View Post
Check your bolt rating, look at the head of the bolt, count ticks on bolt. 5 is usually the stronger rating for the bolt.
Only use grade #8 for these applications.
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Old 07-09-2019, 01:12 AM   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lenny View Post
Only use grade #8 for these applications.
I'll be using class 10.9 bolts (equivalent of Grade 8 in metric) to mount the bumper for sure, but I was surprised that Warn's user manual specifies Grade 5 bolts (not included) for mounting the winch. The Powerplant can only be mounted feet down, so the bolts are in shear. Personally I'll use Grade 8 though.

I think I'll stick with the 4-bolt bumper mounting points. Bolts are stronger in tension than shear anyhow, so unless the welded mounting plates are a weak point the only "benefit" of mounting to the frame somehow would be if I were to defeat the convoluted section. Since no one is screaming that this is necessary, I'll call it good enough. Thanks for the input!
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Old 07-09-2019, 09:04 AM   #25
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Nothing wrong with exceeding the grade 5 bolts.
I have a 12,000 lb winch mounted on a cold steel platform attached to the frame.
Designed by a welding project manager.........and "it's also good enough".
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Old 07-09-2019, 09:44 AM   #26
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Synthetic rope vs steel rope: Which one is best?
Written: November 18, 2011
by Andy Lilienthal

As you may have heard, Warn Industries now offer six winches with our Spydura synthetic rope. Those winches are the VR8000-s, VR10000-s, M8000-s, 9.5xp-s, 9.5cti-s, and the 9.0Rc.

A lot of people have asked questions about our rope and our opinion of synthetic vs. steel rope, so here is some information.

WARN Spydura synthetic rope is made from an ultra high molecular polyethylene material. It receives a coat of black urethane that helps protect the rope from the affects of ultra-violet rays and chemicals as two enemies of synthetic rope. The rope also includes a sliding sleeve to help protect it from wear and abrasion while winching. All WARN truck/SUV winches equipped with Spydura rope should be used with our polished aluminum hawse fairlead, too.

The synthetic vs. steel debate has heated up recently, as synthetic rope becomes more mainstream. Here's our take on it.

Spydura synthetic rope is a great product for many vehicle recovery situations. If you winch a lot and are concerned about weight, synthetic can be a great option since it is lightweight and easy to handle. It doesn't develop sharp burrs like steel rope, and doesn't store as much potential energy when under load. On the flip side, synthetic rope is more prone to abrasion, and should be regularly inspected for frays or other damage caused by UV, chemicals, and overall use. And when using synthetic, you always want to lay down the abrasion sleeve when needed to guard against rope damage.

Steel rope is extremely durable, and is good for both vehicle recovery and utility work, such as moving trees, rocks, etc., since it resists abrasion very well. Ultra-violet wear is also not a factor with steel rope, and it may be a better choice for you if you don't frequently use your winch. Steel rope is heavier than synthetic, can develop rust, and can also develop sharp burrs. This is one reason why we always recommend users always wear heavy gloves to protect their hands while handling the rope.

Some people immediately think synthetic rope is safer than steel rope. Although steel rope will store more potential energy, since it's made out of steel, it is less prone to abrasion (and possible fraying). The bottom line is that no matter which line you choose, you need to follow safe winching techniques and take all necessary safety precautions. In fact, you can download Warn Industries' The Basic Guide to Winching Techniques to brush up or learn more about how to use your winch and practice safe winching.

https://www.warn.com/synthetic-rope-...ch-one-is-best
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Old 07-09-2019, 09:46 AM   #27
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Thanks guys great info. I will at minimum get the 12k. So far I have not needed a winch with the van but I have been very careful and have plenty of experience digging out. The big reason is if I do get reallt stuck no jeep with a 6k is pulling the beast out. Currently I have recovery boards and high lift.
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Old 04-06-2020, 08:15 AM   #28
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I have the Smittybilt winch hitch so that I can move the 12000lb winch front or back as needed, and also did not want to block airflow to the 6.0 with a full bumper. My question is, I will run the positive lead to the battery front and back, but do I need to run the negative lead to the battery, or can I just ground to the chassis near the winch front and back? Also, I need a plug that will handle the load of the winch, so I can plug in front or back...I don’t have access to the standard quick connects. Can I adapt 110v or 220v 30amp sockets for this?
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Old 04-06-2020, 09:13 AM   #29
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This was the cheapest place I could find for the pole connectors back when I put my system together.

https://powerwerx.com/anderson-power...-sb-connectors



I do have a question for anyone else that has their winch on a caddy for front and back use. I noticed that the positive lead inside my pole connector has severely eroded away. Is this due to a constant power source hitting a dead end or did it just erode away cause I didnít clean it regularly enough? Would a cutoff switch be a good idea?
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Old 04-06-2020, 10:14 AM   #30
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Yes, run it to the battery.

Any high-current loads grounded through the chassis, can cause stray current paths that can mess with the electronics, and the TorqueShift is more susceptible to damage from this than older transmissions.
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