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Old 11-27-2021, 02:43 PM   #1
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Replacing fixed rear glass/butyl.

Someone shattered my rear driver cargo door glass. So I Sourced new tinted glass and butyl for under $80. (Better than time finding and removing junk yard glass w/o butyl)
But here is the thing. My old glass and butyl came off and left plastic frame attached to door. Seems to be 2 layers of butyl - 1 glass to frame and 1 frame to door metal.
So Iím just replacing glass to frame butyl. (Donít think I had any leaks before breakage).
So. Do I just apply butyl to frame in outer groove and then put the bolts into glass and fit it in place onto the butyl and into screw holes? Then slowly tighten the nuts to compress the butyl? Is that it? Cure time? Other factors /considerations or recommendations? (Yes I know slow and low torque on the bolts).

Iím gonna tape the screws in place to outside of glass to keep them steady. Iíve cleaned most of the old butyl off. Iíve sanded primed and painted old bolts to freshen up. What else should I do?
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Old 11-27-2021, 03:02 PM   #2
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I read that I should refrigerate the butyl and that I should install against the cover tape first then peel the cover tape by having it partial peeled in one spot.
This seems risky in breaking the protective tape and not being able to recover the rest.
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Old 11-28-2021, 09:45 AM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Clarkboulder View Post
So. Do I just apply butyl to frame in outer groove and then put the bolts into glass and fit it in place onto the butyl and into screw holes? Then slowly tighten the nuts to compress the butyl? Is that it? Cure time?
I had to replace one of my rear windows a couple summers ago. What you described is basically what I did. I did no refrigeration or anything like that. In fact, you may want to get it snugged up then put the van in the sun to warm the butyl a bit then snug the bolts down some more. I seem to recall that the window could be tightened a bit more after some time. Use the other window as a guide for how much to tighten down. They should be about flush to each other. Thatís what worked for me. Have not noticed any leaks in the last two winters (except from the weather stripping ).
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Old 11-28-2021, 10:30 AM   #4
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Replacing fixed rear glass/butyl.

Best to take off the whole frame and start clean. From inside the door, run a utility knife vertically between the metal door skin and the frame to break the butyl seal. Use a putty knife or a big flat-blade screwdriver to pry off the plastic frame.

Scrape any residual butyl off the door (a plastic putty knife works for this). Then clean any residue off with a rag and acetone.

I donít get the idea to refrigerate the new butyl. It actually is easier to install if itís warm and pliable. I often will take a hair dryer to warm it up. Warm butyl will more easily compress down and not put undue stress on the glass when tightening. Put the butyl tape in the channel on the window frame. When installing either remove the glass from the frame before install or tighten the install nuts very carefully and evenly as not to twist and shatter the safety glass.
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Old 11-28-2021, 10:34 AM   #5
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Brian is right…I did take off the frame. Be extremely careful taking it off, it’s very fragile and hard to source a replacement.
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Old 11-28-2021, 03:51 PM   #6
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I get what y’all’s sayin about the frame but being that it’s fragile, hard to source and not leaking, why would I venture into this if I don’t need to? Seems silly to take those risks. If they were a dime a dozen and readily available I could see going for it but I can’t see the risk worthiness.
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Old 11-28-2021, 09:54 PM   #7
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Replacing fixed rear glass/butyl.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Clarkboulder View Post
I get what yíallís sayin about the frame but being that itís fragile, hard to source and not leaking, why would I venture into this if I donít need to? Seems silly to take those risks. If they were a dime a dozen and readily available I could see going for it but I canít see the risk worthiness.

Do whatever you want. I thought you were asking about how to do a full removal and reinstall. The frame is not ďfragileĒ at all. The glass certainly is. And I donít know about where you live, but Iíve been to junkyards in multiple states and there are always e-Van fixed windows readily available. Not for a dime a dozen, but usually $25-35 each.
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Old 11-29-2021, 03:12 AM   #8
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If you have some seizing wire it works well for cutting through the old butyl to remove the frame. Wrap each of the ends around a small piece of wood. Just have to reinsert at each frame stud. I find it does less damage to the door paint than using a metal scraper for cutting through.

I agree with the sun and "warm" approach.
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Old 11-29-2021, 08:04 AM   #9
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I'm actually in the auto/truck glass biz so take this FWIW.....

Quote:
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Do whatever you want. I thought you were asking about how to do a full removal and reinstall. The frame is not ďfragileĒ at all. The glass certainly is. And I donít know about where you live, but Iíve been to junkyards in multiple states and there are always e-Van fixed windows readily available. Not for a dime a dozen, but usually $25-35 each.
^^^Absolutely great DIY advice for those who rarely if ever do this task---pay it heed!

The newest rear/side door glass have the attachment studs and frame already part of the glass depending what year it is intended to fit. We call it "encapsulated" FWIW.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Clarkboulder View Post
I get what yíallís sayin about the frame but being that itís fragile, hard to source and not leaking, why would I venture into this if I donít need to? Seems silly to take those risks. If they were a dime a dozen and readily available I could see going for it but I canít see the risk worthiness.
YOU would risking glass breakage during removal or installation if you're heavy handed or careless. The reason to replace the butyl tape on the frame AND the glass is to renew both---doing only one sides adds the risk of the oldest butyl leaking due its age.

As already suggested do as you like and good luck with it at that.
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Old 12-03-2021, 10:43 AM   #10
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Yes, I have taken this advice and removed both layers. In doing so noticed that the frame-to-door butyl was in fact compromised in one corner so glad I did. Ordered more butyl. Of course these tasks are always a pandoras box....one things leads to others so removing that layer exposed some paint issues under/or at the butyl layer against the door frame. So now I must sand, prime, and repaint a small section of door paint that entirely sits behind the outer window glass overhang. A body shop wants $500 to repaint the whole door which while itís sounds inexpensive seems entirely unnecessary for such a small hidden section. So now I add this to my to do list before the deep freeze of winter. Never ends. Hopefully my repainting skills are up to task and this will last.
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