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Old 09-20-2020, 06:34 AM   #11
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Nice mod.

Ford Econolines from 92 - 2007 were Type C door locks, E-series 2008 was Type C door lock, E-series 2008 - 2016 was Type B door locks.

-greg
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Old 09-20-2020, 02:41 PM   #12
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If you open one of your door lock switches and inspect them, you will see that they are nothing more than a manual 12 volt relay. In order to swap door panels you have to remove those old switches (relays). The problem arises in that you are now installing a switch that is not designed to carry 12 volt positive loads, where as your old switches are. The new switches are designed to send a ground signal, not transfer voltage from a source to a load.

Your new door lock switches are nothing more than a momentary on-off switch. Where as your old door lock switches are actually manual relays.

With that said you have to replace the old switches (relays) with something that will transfer 12 volts from a source to a load (door actuator) using a ground signal. Since the old switch is nothing more than a manual relay, we can simply replace them with electric relays, keeping in mind the door locks utilize reverse polarity to lock and unlock the door locks (actuators).

The new door lock switches are only capable of sending a ground signal when the button is pressed. They have 4 wires, one wire is hot always when the key is on, that wire illuminates the LED's inside the switch. The other three wires are ground wires, one wire is a constant ground and the other two are switched grounds that send a ground signal to the relay when the button is pressed. If you try to send voltage threw the new switches you will fry them because they arent designed to carry voltage/amperage.

You have to manufacture a relay system for each door that uses a negative (ground) signal to activate the relays, in turn sending 12 volts from a source to the load (door lock actuators).

The actuators have two wires, for this example we will call our wires purple and green, but we cant confuse them as being positive and negative because the system uses reverse polarity. Meaning In order to lock the door for example... 12 volts is sent threw the purple wire while green acts as ground, in order to unlock the door 12 volts is then sent threw the green wire while the purple acts as ground. This switching is accomplished inside the relays.

Keep in mind that each door has its own actuator, that means each door must have its own relay system. It is the relays job to insure that a wire isnt grounded when a 12 volt signal is sent to that wire, and of course the person responsible for wiring the system in the first place.

Here is a good example of a door lock relay system activated by a ground signal. Since the actuators utilize reverse polarity the system requires two relays per actuator to accomplish the reverse polarity effect.


Your new window switches will function properly by simply cutting the wires and splicing them correctly while referencing the correct wiring diagrams for each vehicle involved.

Im baffled as to how it has taken nearly 13 years for anyone to post up the proper solution to this conversion. You cant just yank relays (door lock switches) out of a circuit and expect the system to function without replacing those relays with something that performs the same task. Youre Welcome....
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Old 09-20-2020, 04:01 PM   #13
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Im baffled as to how it has taken nearly 13 years for anyone to post up the proper solution to this conversion. You cant just yank relays (door lock switches) out of a circuit and expect the system to function without replacing those relays with something that performs the same task. Youre Welcome....
I'm confident some will benefit from your outline on how to make this swap, Sure hope this Forum has something to offer you in return...
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Old 09-20-2020, 06:05 PM   #14
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Well i guess the important thing for everyone to take away from this is that the old switches arent just an on-off switch throwing twelve volts at a door lock mechanism. Those old switches were relays and they not only sent 12 volts to the appropriate wire, they also created the reverse polarity required for the system to function as designed.
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Old 09-20-2020, 06:11 PM   #15
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If theres a mad rush to swap door panels on your rig, post up your results and tell me how wonderful and brilliant i am....

Well unless your rig catches fire and burns to the ground then its ok to give credit to someone else. JK
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Old 09-20-2020, 11:02 PM   #16
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Here is a little diagram that might help some folks understand exactly how complicated the original lock switches are. They are more than a simple on-off switch, not only do they direct 12 volt current, they also reverse that current depending on which way the button is pushed (locked or unlocked). This is what we are attempting to reproduce utilizing electric relays in place of the OEM switches that we removed.
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Old 09-21-2020, 05:59 AM   #17
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So the old switch is a DPDT (mom)-off-(mom) switch, and the new switch is a SPDT (mom)-off-(mom), so you have to add the two SPDT relays.

-greg
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Old 09-21-2020, 10:40 AM   #18
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Yes, however the new switch is for low voltage or ground circuits only. I was trying to keep it simple so everyone can understand exactly what it is they need to do. Did i complicate it instead?
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Old 09-21-2020, 11:57 AM   #19
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Well unless your rig catches fire and burns to the ground JK
I would hope that any new relay circuits would be properly fused, thereby reducing the possibility of a melt down. (rubber hammer, sand box, steel ball busters aside)
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Old 09-21-2020, 03:37 PM   #20
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The switch circuits are already fused. You arent creating new circuits, youre merely replacing manual switches with electric relays. If something shorts out it blows the very same fuse it would have blown with the old switches.

But youre right, theres always that one guy who can screw up a wet dream even if you draw him a picture.
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