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Old 10-27-2016, 09:05 PM   #11
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A bit more info to add to this thread was acquired last week on my visit to SoCal. The trip provided a wonderful privilege to spend time with boywonder in/under/around our vans while knocking off a few projects together.

We needed to make a run to HD and decided to set up his pressure sensing gizmos both on top of and under the hood of our 2002 7.3 EB (I cannot believe I did not shoot a single pic). We also set up a couple of streamers on top of the hood. The streamers and outside pressure sensor were all set up around the center of the hood about six or so inches in from the back edge of the hood, with the sensor tube opening angled about 45 deg backwards relative to the center-line of the van. Did this to compensate for any airflow pressures (high/low) from forward movement. The sensor under the hood was placed forward of the fire wall a couple of inches to approx. the same under hood location as the sensor on top.

Off we went and it turned out there was an ever so very slight pressure differential between above and below the hood. The yarn pieces streamed flat against the hood and aft slightly toward their respective sides of the van. The under hood sensor showed there was much less than one psi differential at all speeds from 30 to 70mph.

(Dr. boywonder can offer a more expert opinion): I (Mr. Amateur) felt there was no strong evidence, based on an uncut/non louvered hood, to suggest hood louvers by themselves on 1992 to 2007 Ford Econoline vans would do anything to extract or feed air into the engine compartment at speed. They would of course provide a path where the hot air can escape upwards when the vehicle is at rest.

It would be great to replicate this test on an actual louvered hood to confirm these observations. The next step, if someone is keen on hood mods, maybe looking at a hood "scoop" in that location instead of just louvers to deliver an air stream "into" the upper back end of engine compartment behind the air cleaner elements. This will also deliver lots of other dirty environmental stuff.
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Old 10-27-2016, 09:21 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 1der View Post
I cannot believe I did not shoot a single pic.....

...well I took one......







We used a couple of digital manometers that I had laying around (doesn't everyone have these laying around?)......a Dwyer and a Netech. Both of these read down to way less than a mm of water, or mm of hg, or bar or psi....whatever you want.

We had one attached to the top of the hood, and the other under the hood...then used both ports of the dwyer, one on top and one underneath the hood..same results.

and, as 1der mentioned above, even at 65-70 mph the pressure differential from the top of the hood to the underside of the hood in roughly the middle of the hood is a mouse-fart....perhaps a sub-mouse-fart.......

...maybe an inch of water......at speed
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Old 10-28-2016, 12:49 AM   #13
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Pretty sure I read that ford engineered the hood shapes to sub mousefart pressure differential.

So you guys aren't convinced that the hood louvers really provide any extra cooling at speed??
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Old 10-28-2016, 10:35 AM   #14
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So, in general, I'd agree. I haven't seen any significant change in engine or transmission temps after the installation of louvers.

But, maybe we should do this same test on my van.. boywonder, feel like sending those fancy gizmos up to Ray? We can replicate the set up you did and try on my van.
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Old 10-28-2016, 10:42 AM   #15
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But, maybe we should do this same test on my van.. boywonder, feel like sending those fancy gizmos up to Ray? We can replicate the set up you did and try on my van.
Sure.........

the message you have entered is too short....
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Old 10-28-2016, 01:20 PM   #16
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I have no idea if my side vents work at speed. I do know that at slow speeds or parked with the engine fan engaged I can not hold my hand in front of them for long.
I need to do a better photo shoot and drive the van first instead of let it idle.
I happen to have a thermal camera at work.
Probably not the best representation but this is at idle and shows the heat signature difference. The lighter the color, the hotter it is.....until it gets real hot, then the color graph on the right hand side comes into play and your ears get hot.
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Old 12-05-2016, 11:14 PM   #17
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Having used my "centered" hood vests now for a few months I cannot report any difference in Coolant or oil deltas. The Turbo does seem to run much cooler as my pedal to the metal on a crazy climb keeps the pyro under 1.5k Dg F. The turbo also cools much faster down to 400 Deg F.

When iddle it also vents lots of heat from the engine Compartment. I inspected for water intrusion after an intense rain in north cal and didn't find any wetted areas.

So given the cool looks and improve turbo temps I say it's Was worthwhile.
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Old 12-07-2016, 04:42 PM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 1der View Post
A bit more info to add to this thread was acquired last week on my visit to SoCal. The trip provided a wonderful privilege to spend time with boywonder in/under/around our vans while knocking off a few projects together.

We needed to make a run to HD and decided to set up his pressure sensing gizmos both on top of and under the hood of our 2002 7.3 EB (I cannot believe I did not shoot a single pic). We also set up a couple of streamers on top of the hood. The streamers and outside pressure sensor were all set up around the center of the hood about six or so inches in from the back edge of the hood, with the sensor tube opening angled about 45 deg backwards relative to the center-line of the van. Did this to compensate for any airflow pressures (high/low) from forward movement. The sensor under the hood was placed forward of the fire wall a couple of inches to approx. the same under hood location as the sensor on top.

Off we went and it turned out there was an ever so very slight pressure differential between above and below the hood. The yarn pieces streamed flat against the hood and aft slightly toward their respective sides of the van. The under hood sensor showed there was much less than one psi differential at all speeds from 30 to 70mph.

(Dr. boywonder can offer a more expert opinion): I (Mr. Amateur) felt there was no strong evidence, based on an uncut/non louvered hood, to suggest hood louvers by themselves on 1992 to 2007 Ford Econoline vans would do anything to extract or feed air into the engine compartment at speed. They would of course provide a path where the hot air can escape upwards when the vehicle is at rest.

It would be great to replicate this test on an actual louvered hood to confirm these observations. The next step, if someone is keen on hood mods, maybe looking at a hood "scoop" in that location instead of just louvers to deliver an air stream "into" the upper back end of engine compartment behind the air cleaner elements. This will also deliver lots of other dirty environmental stuff.

I agree totally and I think a lot of people doesn't want to hear that (NO gains by vents).

I work in the industry and I can say that there is soooo much engendering and testing you cannot think of. I am sure Ford was aware of the heat in the engine department vs school buses with the same engine...

I read an article about the pressure difference before/above the engine hood. Similar result. But I think it was a sports car. They also did measurements.

Getting the engine colder was easiest by letting the sucked air getting cooler, like an intercooler.
I would think of, when in Sahara again (someday...) Getting an extra tube from inside to the engine department. From the aircondition to the engine. Icecold :-)
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Old 12-07-2016, 04:55 PM   #19
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I was worried about the whole pressure differential issue until I also added the fender vents. And saw the big 6 X 6" holes Ford added to the frames that circulate air from inside the fenders.

Finally if Ford would have really tested these DSL they would have not gone with the 6.0.
:-). Sorry too easy.
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