Free 7 Day Trial RV GPS App RV Trip Planner Campground Reviews RV Maintenance Free 7 Day Trial ×
 


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 05-31-2012, 04:19 PM   #501
Senior Member
 
cygvan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Bergen County, NJ
Posts: 219
Re: Hal The Van

Quote:
Originally Posted by WVvan
Quote:
have you considered these

http://www.homedepot.com/h_d1/N-5yc1v/R ... reId=10051

rather than t nuts?
Those might work on the doors and countertop but are too thick for the side panels. I used a bunch of the T-nuts so I'm hoping they will hold OK.
im using them in my cabinet frame, which for me is wood. threaded knobs go through a door panel that i can remove to access my battery stack. hinges werent an option for me there due to clearances provided by my design so a removable panel that matches the door panel on the upper part of the cabinet was needed. they hold very well.

the one i linked to has a collar, others (and the ones i used) do not. so they sit flush with the surface without countersinking...does the one with the collar make it too thick to use in your application? just curious.

i really like the tip out trash bin...i made no provision for one in my build...its funny the things you leave out lol....for now, im reusing plastic bags from the grocery store and hanging them on a hook.
__________________

__________________
Red Zeppelin - 2003 Chevy Express 2500 6.0L 2WD RB
cygvan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-01-2012, 09:09 PM   #502
Site Team
 
WVvan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 1,293
Re: Hal The Van

Quote:
does the one with the collar make it too thick to use in your application?
For the side cover panels it does since they are only 1/3" thick.
__________________

__________________
Open the pod bay doors Hal.

Once I exit Hal, this is what I do.
https://larry.wvnet.edu/~van/pics/lic...late-small.jpg
WWW.WVBIKE.ORG
WVvan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-01-2012, 10:51 PM   #503
Site Team
 
WVvan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 1,293
Re: Hal The Van

Kitchen Cabinet, Post #14

The cover panels are only laminated on one side. Paint the back sides and edges white. Paint the bottom side of the countertop. Paint all sides of the shelf, pump panel and sub panel.


The Webasto heater sits under the kitchen cabinet so have to make some ductwork to get the hot air from it to the inside of the van. In this pic you can see the short length of flexible vent hose that came with the heater when I bought it. Above it is a length of metal ductwork I picked up at Lowe's for around $4.


Took the metal ductwork and squeezed and rolled it like you do with a newspaper till it was small enough to slide into the end of the flexible hose. Used metal duct tape to keep it rolled up.


Attach the ductwork to the outlet end of the heater. Check how it will route through the cabinet.




Use a hacksaw on the metal duct to shorten it.




Measure where I want the end of the duct to meet the front cover panel.


I don't have a metal hole saw the diameter of the duct so use the jigsaw to cut a less-than-perfect round hole in a square of scrap sheet metal.


The grill for the front of the duct opening is taken from an old computer fan. It's just the right size. I cut the sheet metal square to match up with this grill.


Time for an inspection visit.


Align the grill on the front cover panel. Drill four holes for the mount points.


I don't have a metal saw the diameter of the duct but do have one for wood..




Check the duct alignment.


Drill four holes in the metal square that line up with the grill mount points. Use machine screws and nuts to bolt the grill on the front of the cover panel to the square in the back.


Put everything in position.


When I think it's all lined up, use the metal tape to join the square to the duct. Used several pieces of tape overlaid.


Remove the duct from the cabinet and use more metal tape on the other side of the square. I found that many narrow pieces did a better job than a few larger pieces due to the curved duct. It's not pretty but by the time I was finished the metal square was solidly joined to the duct.


Wrap the metal duct in a spare piece of EZ Cool insulation.


I've read where some people open their cabinets to be sure the water piping doesn't freeze in cold weather. Since my water system sits directly above the heater I don't think that will be a problem. I'm adding the insulation so more heat makes it out into the van.

That's it for the ductwork.

When he thought I wasn't looking I caught Tiger looking for loose change in the cushions.




I have to keep my money hidden from Tiger. He's got a catnip problem.

continued -
__________________
Open the pod bay doors Hal.

Once I exit Hal, this is what I do.
https://larry.wvnet.edu/~van/pics/lic...late-small.jpg
WWW.WVBIKE.ORG
WVvan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-02-2012, 02:58 PM   #504
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Las vegas
Posts: 280
Re: Hal The Van

[s:344fdn6b]how much weight have you added? Minus the chubby cat.[/s:344fdn6b]
__________________
"What'$ that funny noi$e?
Vegasrandall is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-03-2012, 08:07 PM   #505
Site Team
 
WVvan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 1,293
Re: Hal The Van

Kitchen Cabinet, Post #15

Need to install the on-off rocker switch for the water pump. Mark out a location on the the front cover panel of the kitchen cabinet.


The switch requires a square hole. So start with two round holes.


Use a jigsaw to join the two holes then a file to clean up the hole.


Good fit.


Since I'm in a switch installing mood, mount the controller for the Webasto heater.




Prepare the countertop and and it's laminate sheet.


Bought another Formica sheet. Used it to laminate the front side of the three doors.


After the laminate sets up it's time for the edge router.


I'd forgotten how much of a mess routing the edge was


In the middle of this job my cheapo edge bit fell apart. A quick trip to Lowe's and $17.95 later I had the new edge bit, on the left.


After routing use a file to fine tune the edge.


Here's the cut-out for the drop leaf drawer hardware. I'm laminating the front side of this cover panel.


Here's how it looks after edging. I needed the can of "OOPS!" to completely remove the Formica label.


Looking good but still not done.


continued -
__________________
Open the pod bay doors Hal.

Once I exit Hal, this is what I do.
https://larry.wvnet.edu/~van/pics/lic...late-small.jpg
WWW.WVBIKE.ORG
WVvan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-08-2012, 09:25 PM   #506
Site Team
 
WVvan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 1,293
Re: Hal The Van

Hot off the work bench. The electric greywater dump valve in action. It's a 12 volt seat belt tensioner opening and closing a 1-1/2" PVC valve. Not a lot of action but you'll get the idea. I'm under the table powering it directly from two 6 volt batteries. Swapping the leads to get it to change directions. Added two 0.1 ohm resistors in series to slow down the motor.

__________________
Open the pod bay doors Hal.

Once I exit Hal, this is what I do.
https://larry.wvnet.edu/~van/pics/lic...late-small.jpg
WWW.WVBIKE.ORG
WVvan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-09-2012, 10:06 PM   #507
Site Team
 
WVvan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 1,293
Re: Hal The Van

Kitchen Cabinet, Post #16

Laminate the edges of the doors, drop leaf and countertop.








Do two opposite edges on each then after the contact cement sets up, route the edges.


Do the remaining edges.




While the doors are setting up make the final decision on the kitchen cabinet location. Drill through the floor and bolt it down.


Check that the laminated drop leaf and countertop fit right.


They do.


Road test the drop leaf by going camping.






With the drop leaf and countertop I now have a place for my laptop. I took along my regular folding TV tray table and for the first time didn't need it. Found that watching a movie on my laptop requires a spare set of computer speakers to hear properly. There will be a TV in the final build.


Also took along some ribbon LEDs to test out how they would look/work. These are Warm White.


These are Cool White.


The above pictures seem to replicate the light color as I remember it fairly closely. My preference is the warm white for indirect lighting and the cool light for direct lighting.

continued -
__________________
Open the pod bay doors Hal.

Once I exit Hal, this is what I do.
https://larry.wvnet.edu/~van/pics/lic...late-small.jpg
WWW.WVBIKE.ORG
WVvan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-12-2012, 08:57 PM   #508
Site Team
 
WVvan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 1,293
Re: Hal The Van

Kitchen Cabinet, Post #17

Work on the sink next. I'm making the sink from an mixing bowl I bought at WalMart for around $5. Need to drill out the bottom for a drain fitting. I'm measuring and marking the bottom of the bowl to find the exact center when I had one of my "Well Duh!" moments.


It hit me that the bowl is spun aluminum. It's covered by a a series of concentric circles. Just scrape away the bottom label and the center is already marked. Used a punch on the center point


Had to buy a new hole saw large enough for the drain fitting.


Clean up the edge with a round file.


Used silicone II along with the rubber gasket to seal the bottom.


I'm just placing the bowl into the countertop.


The only thing holding it down will be the silicone II placed around the underside of the lip.


Because of that I'm double stacking the silicone to get a secure fit.


Pressed down on the bowl. Cleaned up the excess silicone from the edge then put a weight in the center of the bowl to hold it in place while the silicone sets up.


While that's curing go back to the laminated panels. Have to clean off the excess contact cement from near the edges.


Use a one sided razor blade to carefully scrape off the worst of it.


Then acetone and a rag to get the rest.


continued -
__________________
Open the pod bay doors Hal.

Once I exit Hal, this is what I do.
https://larry.wvnet.edu/~van/pics/lic...late-small.jpg
WWW.WVBIKE.ORG
WVvan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-13-2012, 12:03 PM   #509
Site Team
 
WVvan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 1,293
Re: Hal The Van

Kitchen Cabinet, Post #18

Replace the wood screws holding the pump and accumulator to the back panel with bolts and nuts.




It's now time to create a greywater tank for the kitchen cabinet sink. First thing is to find what space is available. Take some measurements from under the van then transfer that info to a pizza box. I'll be using a DiCarlo's Pizza box since it is made of cardboard that is similar to posterboard.


For those of you who are not familiar with DiCarlo's Pizza it is a regional pizza chain mostly located in the Upper Ohio River Valley area. If you grew up in the this area, as I did, then there's a good chance you think of DiCarlo's like manna from heaven. A few months back Parade Magazine listed it in their "America's Best Pizzerias: The Honor Roll". The DiCarlo's Elm Grove location is just off the I-70/I-470 split so it's easy to get to. Just be warned that there are no chairs so you have to stand while you wait and they don't take credit cards. I always make sure to grab a couple boxes worth whenever passing through my hometown of Wheeling, WV which is why I have the boxes handy.

The greywater tank will go under the van in the area between the passenger side frame beam and the side cargo door. In this picture you can see I've removed the shield I built for the Webasto heater fuel pump to allow more room for the tank. So the size of this area dictates how wide I can make the tank. I don't want the tank to extend too far below the bottom edge of the van so that gives me the height. I'm moving the cardboard along the frame beam checking clearances.


So using those measurements as a cross section the next decision is how long to make the tank. Since two 5 gallon tanks are the fresh water source I thought that six gallons would be a good size. That will hold a one complete 5 gallon tank with some room to spare. I usually don't stay in one space more than 3-4 days and will be dumping the tank after I leave so six gallons should work. That gave me the length of the tank.

Once I had the measurements I started thinking about what to make the tank from. Had original thought of making it from metal but once I had the dimensions and did the math that would be a lot of metal. Someone had recently posted in a forum about constructing a tank by cutting out styrofoam blocks in the shape of a tank then fiberglassing over the styrofoam to make the tank. After enough fiberglassing was done to build up the tank, dissolve the styrofoam from inside. Thought that might be a possibility so got on the Internet and started reading about making your own fiberglass tanks and found another way. Make the tank from plywood then epoxy the plywood to make it water proof. Decided I'd give that a go.

Still had plenty of scrap plywood laying around. Used 3/4" for the bottom and the ends since they might have to deal with rock hits. For the long sides I re-used more of the left over floor panels. By the way, this time I was able to get the biscuit cutter without injuring myself.


Here the plywood tank is partially built. I'm checking the fit before gluing on the one side.


There were two bolts that extended from a muffler hanger through the frame beam. I cut off the extended threaded part to make room for the tank.


Made a couple changes for fit.


Here is the completed tank. The topmost plywood piece is not attached.




For epoxy using US Composites 635 Thin Epoxy Resin System. This is all new to me so before starting read the epoxy guides at West Systems.


It's a two part system that is mixed in a 3:1 ratio. I didn't want to mess with graduated containers so I invested in a electronic scale from Harbor Freight. I checked with US Composites and they wrote that ratio by weight is still 3:1.


Covering the outside of the tank with a layer of fiberglass.


Folded the cloth and trimmed to fit then stapled in place. This gave me mixed results which I'll cover later.


To position the box upside down I added a couple of 2x4 pieces to the battery frame cover I'd made before.




continued -
__________________
Open the pod bay doors Hal.

Once I exit Hal, this is what I do.
https://larry.wvnet.edu/~van/pics/lic...late-small.jpg
WWW.WVBIKE.ORG
WVvan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-13-2012, 09:37 PM   #510
Site Team
 
WVvan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 1,293
Re: Hal The Van

Kitchen Cabinet, Post #19

Before starting the epoxying I had the garage door open and a fan blowing directly on me.


Here's the first batch of epoxy mix. Using a plastic body putty spreader to smear the epoxy over the fiberglass. This worked real well because when the epoxy drys it just peels off the scraper. I'll also be using a cheap chip brush which will be thrown away when done. I'm wearing disposable gloves. Went through a bunch of these. I've since been told they can be reused if cleaned off with alcohol. The gloves are pretty cheap so I don't know that it's worth the effort.


Spreading the epoxy on this box was one of the stickiest, messiest things I've ever done. Because of the mess I didn't take many pictures for fear of gumming up my camera. From what I've read if you let the epoxy cure there is a problem getting additional layers to stick. So instead once begun just waited till the previous layer started setting up before I added the next layer. Kept that up until I was done. This took a few hours.

Here it is part way through. Didn't put down near enough newspapers. I would pick it up by the base to move it around so all sides could be worked on. It was like working with a giant fly strip. Sticky.


In this picture you can see along the outside corner on the end the fiberglass is a lighter color. I found that this is the problem with wrapping and stapling the fiberglass cloth to the box before starting with the epoxy. As the epoxy is spread around the fiberglass cloth starts to stretch. So even though it was taunt when I began, after awhile it begins to pull away from the wood at each corner.


My solution was to cut through the cloth along the corners then overlap the two pieces. That took up most of the slack. Then cut several strips of fiberglass cloth and use them to reinforce the corners. Spread more epoxy

Cut more fiberglass cloth and used it reinforce the bottom and ends. Epoxied it then added another layer.


After around 4 or 5 layers of epoxy I called it quits.


Let it sit for a day then trimmed off the excess fiberglass strands. The surface of the epoxy is no longer tacky but it has a slight oily feel that takes another day to go away.


Next I have to epoxy the inside of the tank but there is some other things I have to get done first.

Here is the tank under the van. Between the epoxy and the fiberglass the tank is now so wide it's a snug fit between the frame beam and the underside of the van. It's staying in position without me holding it.


I had to add an extension to the Webasto fuel line so it will reach around the front of the tank.




Next decision. How to mount the tank. The frame beam already comes with a bunch of holes. Instead of making my own, see about using a couple of these.


Found a couple that line up with the area where I need the end of the tank to be. Make a bracket that will fit the tank and the holes.




Add what I call a positioning bolt to the end of the tank. The positioning bolt's purpose is to fix the location of the tank so I can remove the tank but still return it to the same spot. Hopefully close enough for what I need.


continued -
__________________

__________________
Open the pod bay doors Hal.

Once I exit Hal, this is what I do.
https://larry.wvnet.edu/~van/pics/lic...late-small.jpg
WWW.WVBIKE.ORG
WVvan is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off

» Sportsmobile Registry

Margot

FCAshevlle

Vanzilla

Glenn P.
Add your Sportsmobile
Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v3.2.3
Disclaimer:

This website is not affiliated with or endorsed by Sportsmobile SIP or any of its affiliates. This is an independent, unofficial site.


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 06:08 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
×