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Old 03-22-2010, 06:46 PM   #11
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Re: 6.0 tips

I'll have to look into that. Most of the people I have talked to say to let it warm a bit before idle up. Do you have any links about it Mike? Sure would like to know. I think it is a turbo issue if I remember. I understand about not putting your foot into it but the engine still needs to shift at a higher than idle mode. I also have been told to bring the engine to full operating temps whenever possible rather than short cold runs.

[edit] Maybe this does not apply to the 6.0
After starting the engine on a cold day, allow the engine to warm up a few minutes before putting the tractor under load. Proper engine operation temperatures assure more efficient fuel combustion and may prevent damage to cold engine parts. Engine oil flows more readily at operating temperatures and allows proper lubrication of upper engine parts and areas.
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Old 03-22-2010, 08:27 PM   #12
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Re: 6.0 tips

Dave ,
Oddly enough this exactly what the Boys at Banks Engineering told me to do especially with the 6.0 the 7.3 is not as sensitive to reduced engine temperatures , They said that once the engine reached 90 to 110 degree's that you should be within safe parameters . At this point I have had so much well meaning advice that I am not really sure what the correct procedure might
be so I look to you Boy's for my information on the Diesels .
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Old 03-22-2010, 08:58 PM   #13
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Re: 6.0 tips

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ford_6L_E350
Quote:
Originally Posted by daveb

I think the cold idle is the hardest on the engine. I simply start up and drive away. It takes me 5-10 minutes of easy city streets before I can get to a freeway and gently run up to speed.

Mike

I do the same. If it's below freezing, I plug up the engine for at least 3-4 hours. Then drive away, taking it easy no matter how many cars get pissed.

My engine takes FOREVER to warm up unless I build some RPMs. I once drove all the way down Lippencott Mine rd 1st thing in the AM and the engine never got to operating temp.
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Old 03-22-2010, 10:48 PM   #14
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Re: 6.0 tips

I stopped by Zylstra Automotive in Visalia, CA today with my van to talk preventative measures for longevity. Here's what they recommended:

1. EGR Block (my van is not registered in CA).
2. 4" exhaust and removal of Cat.
3. New intake.
4. Mag-Hytec Tranny Pan.
5. Edge Insight to monitor and get codes.
6. Programmer to clear codes from EGR Block and adjust shift points.

They believe Ford has addressed the 6.0 head gasket and stud issue in the newer vans (mine is '09). Because of this they also feel a coolant filter is not required. Finally, they think the Amsoil filter is good, but think changing the oil every 5k is more important and economical.

Sanity check from those with more experience with the 6.0 please. Thanks.

Oh, my owners manual has recommendations on operating the engine. Only one I currently remember is to idle after heavy use to allow the turbo to cool. Recommend you check yours for tips.
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Old 03-23-2010, 12:10 AM   #15
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Re: 6.0 tips

The vans have never really had head gasket issues because they are de-tuned by over 80 hp from the trucks.
As far as the coolant filter, Ford has made no changes in the design of the oil cooler (this is what plugs up on the coolant side and destroys the EGR cooler). Perhaps Ford has done a better job of getting the casting sand out of the coolant passages in the block on the newer models.

A brief description of the common Oil Cooler/EGR failure problem from www.bulletproofdiesel.com

So why replace your Engine Oil Cooler at the same time
as your EGR Cooler?
What does an engine oil cooler have to do with an EGR cooler?
While the two parts dont seem to be related, they definitely are. First of all, a few facts:
1. The engine oil cooler is NOT in the front of your rig. Its actually located
on top of your engine directly underneath your engine oil filter.
2. Your engine oil is cooled down by the coolant from the engine.
3. Your engine oil in a Power Stroke diesel is vital to the operation and longevity of your motor.

So, with all that being said, what does the engine cooler have to do with the EGR cooler?
To understand why, you have to know how this system works. The cold coolant coming out of
the radiator enters into the water pump. A portion of that coolant, about a gallon per minute,
is pushed through the engine oil cooler on its way to the EGR cooler. Said a different way,
the ONLY coolant that the EGR cooler gets is whatever coolant comes through the engine oil cooler.

The problem comes about when you consider the design and placement of the engine oil cooler.
Simply put it has tight, narrow passageways that conduct the oil and coolant through it.
(see cut-away view at right) It is also set up like a plumbers P trap, meaning that it catches
lots of sediment because its a low spot in the plumbing system. All of this sediment, in turn,
plugs up and restricts the narrow channels inside the cooler. This, of course, restricts the flow of
coolant getting through the cooler, much like an auto accident slows down traffic on a busy road.

All this restriction of flow through the engine oil cooler starves the EGR cooler of the
coolant that it needs to do its job.
Its sort of like asking a bunch of fire fighters to put out a forest fire with a garden hose
it just isnt going to go well.

Because the EGR cooler isnt being cooled with enough flow, it tends to get upse
t and starts to crack and/or rupture.
This, of course, is probably the reason why you are on BulletProofDiesel.com in the first place!

The bad news is that the engine oil cooler is going to cost you a bit more money.
The good news is that the labor

to change both pieces is about the same if you do one or do both. The best news is that
we have it all packaged together.
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Old 03-23-2010, 01:07 AM   #16
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Re: 6.0 tips

Ok, so the million dollar question is this: If I go with an EGR Block, do I care about EGR cooling? My logic would say no. However, my logic didn't design the engine or the EGR Block.

Anyone know the right answer?
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Old 03-23-2010, 08:48 AM   #17
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Re: 6.0 tips

jess,
An EGR delete kit removes the EGR cooler and replaces it with a coolant pipe that circulates back into the oil cooler. Granted, if your oil cooler plugs on the coolant side of things it will not cause the EGR rupture and associated problems. However, the oil cooler and it's crappy design with very small passages is still there. Overall a coolant filter is cheap insurance even with an EGR delete kit. Very high oil temps can cause problems.

I know it's complicated, it took a lot of reading, research etc. for me to wrap my head around this stuff.
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Old 03-23-2010, 10:45 AM   #18
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Re: 6.0 tips

I would just add that a coolant filter is not just for casting sand. The engine-block is cast iron, which can corrode and bits of rust flake off into the cooling system. The coolant additives help to reduce this, but unless you are running 100% glycol, some corrosion will probably still occur.

-e
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Old 03-23-2010, 10:47 AM   #19
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Re: 6.0 tips

That makes sense with a kit that deletes the EGR. However, Zylstra is taking about a block. That is not nearly as obvious to me.

Thanks for the info. I'll ask a more detailed question at Zylstra.
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Old 03-23-2010, 12:07 PM   #20
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Re: 6.0 tips

I've also been told some filters have a neutralizing agent in them that helps. Never really researched it though. Can't block the EGR here in Ca.
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