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Old 05-08-2020, 03:32 PM   #11
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One word answer...

Hemi.

The swap is the most efficient way to improve an older Dodge.
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Old 05-08-2020, 05:54 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SMB123 View Post
Something sounds wrong with the whole equation.


I had a 5.9 v8 "magnum" (he says sarcastically). It's a low torque pig but it will get you where you want to go.


If it can't go with the vehicle in low gear, there must be a major malfunction. I had a low power problem due to an air cleaner issue - made a surprising diff. The next logical step for gearing would be 4.10 but that wouldn't make a huge diff based on the description. Is it possible the engine is tired? How's the compression?


I'd sure as heck diagnose the actual problem before throwing money at it.
Thanks for the info, I have larger tires (32s) and was aired down significantty, but yea let me do a Compression test and see how it is performing.

A hemi swap sounds cool, but way out of my league and getting it done would be pretty pricey
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Old 05-09-2020, 09:38 PM   #13
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Just hang a transfer case on the back of the tranny...all you'll have to do is shorten the drive shaft. Then, when you need some low gears just put it in low range and at least double your gearing.

I use 4-Lo all the time with my rigs but don't lock the hubs when all I need is some really low gearing.
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Old 05-09-2020, 11:18 PM   #14
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I had a similar experience with my 5.4l v8 e250 that's right around 8k lbs (open rear diff, 2wd). Got solidly stuck in a snow bank and couldnt get the wheels to budge when being pulled forwards. No power to them whatsoever. Still not sure if that was to be expected, given the situation, or not good. I did end up having an ignition coil die within the next month, if that could be related.
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Old 05-10-2020, 10:04 AM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by deserteagle56 View Post
Just hang a transfer case on the back of the tranny...all you'll have to do is shorten the drive shaft. Then, when you need some low gears just put it in low range and at least double your gearing.

I use 4-Lo all the time with my rigs but don't lock the hubs when all I need is some really low gearing.
Agree with using 4 Low for more gearing in otherwise easy conditions. Works great and no climbing out to lock hubs.

Sadly his 98 Dodge will need a reworked tank to allow space for a transfer case.

Very hard to rework a polyethylene fuel tank. Great for lack of corrosion. Not so good for shortening.
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Old 05-12-2020, 03:52 PM   #16
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Quick update, the van is currently in the shop.
Sounds like its either a fuel pressure issue or a clogged cat. Can't get this thing go over 4k RPM.
Past the cat the exhaust also gets up to 900F.
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Old 05-12-2020, 04:22 PM   #17
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4000 rev max; I'll go with the cat cracked and jammed in its case.
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Old 05-12-2020, 09:23 PM   #18
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Woohoo - glad to see follow up.
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Old 05-14-2020, 04:49 PM   #19
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It's in reality not for any lack of power it's lack of getting your torque applied.

Not saying it's your point of view but it drives me crazy everybody I talk to thinks they need this and that a u-joint off-road capable vehicle or $100,000 diesel truck to tow their toy hauler or travel trailer....
What did people do between 1900 and the 1960s when they didn't have 300 horsepower engines matter of fact most things were four and six cylinders with plenty of gears to select from we had a 6 cylinder flatbed truck it was 1400 lbs they had it from their parents and we had it for 25 years it was sold to a third owner running and probably still is and towing thousands of pounds of stuff.
The gentleman that spoke of the transfer case IMO is on point

More power is fun but it's going to be very expensive very frustrating and if and wouldn't get you any farther really then you get now you just get stuck further in.
A partial 4 wheel drive conversion or 4 wheel drive would likely be cheaper and get you just about everywhere you need to go.....
I have a 7.3 with locking rear it's okay but I wouldn't even think about taking it in deep sand or up a steep incline it's absolutely not capable of it.... Sure it might make it up a few of them but it's going to get stuck more often than not. Vans are just absolutely awful in their ability to transfer the weight around and get.... stuck 😆I've met a few folks doing the vans and two of them have spent a small fortune on a the Weld Tech kit and expensive shocks one has a limited-slip the other is still a peg leg.
All that money spent and their van is not capable of getting any farther in the dirt than mine... And they never will.. not without four-wheel drive.
It's fine and dandy but to spend four grand on a lift kit shocks fancy rims and then $1,300 a set for 35" tires.. and think you can go even medium off-roading....good luck w all that.
The Ol Dodges...look so retro cool..... Be awesome once you get your gearing application sorted.
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Old 05-14-2020, 05:17 PM   #20
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It IS the gearing that matters.

A long time ago I had a GMC pickup, 2wd, that I took up into the mountains to get a load of wood. It did just fine when it was empty. When I got a cord of wood on it (which being green was about 3000 lb) - I could not get out of the low spot I was in. Wouldn't spin a tire - just sat there and moaned (automatic tranny) as I pushed on the gas pedal. I had to unload over half the load of wood before it would climb back up the hill. Taught me a lesson - got me an old 4x4 with granny low and a transfer case that gave me all the gearing I needed to never get in a situation like that again.

I would think that, with all the different transfer cases/gear reduction units on the market, something would fit behind that tranny that could be clocked away from the gas tank and fit just fine. Just to get the extra gearing - no need for a front driveshaft.
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