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Old 05-16-2017, 05:19 PM   #21
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Glad the shop is handling the situation like a pro should.
But not everyone is on phasebook...
Can you post the missing info on your thread?
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Old 05-16-2017, 06:48 PM   #22
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Dang.

Ouch.
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Old 05-16-2017, 07:17 PM   #23
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Good job keeping it upright! That could have ended very differently if you hadn't.

Also nice to see that for the most part stuff that needed to stay in place did. Your video is making me re-think some of my fastening methods, in particular the size of strap I have holding the ARB cooler in place.
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Old 05-16-2017, 07:30 PM   #24
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Just got around to watching the video. Holy crap - that's horrible. Glad everyone is okay though.

Driving my van to work tomorrow and taking a torque wrench with me.
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Old 05-16-2017, 09:38 PM   #25
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Oh man. Sorry to see that - glad you're OK.

Torque wrench added to my shopping list and van to do list. Just had my wheels off... guess I will be about checking them!

Anyone have recommendations for said torquing for those of us that are mildly mechanically challenged?
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Old 05-16-2017, 09:55 PM   #26
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I'm with Steve, after Dig having the same thing happened let's hear from a few folks what the torque SHOULD be. I wrench on cars and vans all the time and I have and use a torque wrench, but rarely on my wheels. I just know the feel of my 3' pipe I put over my big ratchet.

What's the recommended torque on aluminum spacers?

What's the recommended torque on steel spacers?

What's the recommended torque on aluminum wheels?

What's the recommended torque on steel wheels?

Sorry to hear about this Max. I too can't believe you stayed upright. I'm sure the retaining wall that destroyed your van is the only thing that kept you from rolling.

Oh, and why is it usually the driver's side that comes loose?
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Old 05-16-2017, 10:07 PM   #27
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140 ft lbs as per Ford.

I use that for spacers as well, although since they rarely come off they never need anything and I check them less.
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Old 05-16-2017, 10:14 PM   #28
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Is that on steel, aluminum, or both?

I've also wondered if it would be a bad idea to use Loc-tite on spacers, maybe not the bulletproof stuff but the 243 (removable medium strength)?
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Old 05-16-2017, 10:31 PM   #29
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The Facebook video should be public just like it was on YouTube or something. Please let me know if you want to see it but still can't.

I've added a few more photos.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bbasso View Post
not everyone is on phasebook...
Can you post the missing info on your thread?
Attached Thumbnails
IMG_4242.jpg   IMG_4243.jpg   IMG_4234.jpg   IMG_4192.jpg  
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Old 05-16-2017, 10:40 PM   #30
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 86Scotty View Post
why is it usually the driver's side that comes loose?
From this very interesting article:

"The mechanism for the left side wheel nuts spinning off as the vehicle travels can be understood from the geometry of the wheel and studs when the wheel is slightly loose. Since the stud holes are larger than the studs, the wheel is not perfectly concentric with the axle when the nuts are loose. When the road pushes up on the tire, the wheel tends to be pushed up relative to the axle centerline. This means the wheel centerline is slightly above the axle centerline. This centerline offset gives rise to a relative velocity vector between each wheel nut and the part of the wheel the nuts touch. This vector is in the loosening direction on the left side when the vehicle is driving forward and is the cause of wheel nuts spinning off the left side.

The right side nuts have that same relative velocity vector, but in the opposite (i.e., tightening) direction. It turns out that this vector is not strong enough to make a loose nut tight again. So, on the right side, a loose nut tends to stay loose rather than spin off. But this invites another mechanism fatigue. When a nut is tight, the clamping force creates large frictional forces at the wheel/hub interface that transfer the vertical forces that support the weight of the car. However, when a nut is loose, there is no clamping force, and the studs now carry the vertical forces. This bends the studs up and down every time the tire rotates. Just as a paper clip breaks when you bend it back and forth a few times, a wheel stud can break when it is bent up and down a few million times. This is called reversed-bending fatigue, and is the reason that right-side studs eventually break off when the nuts are loose."

http://www.meaforensic.com/wheel-separation-investigation-metallurgical-expert-mark-bailey-mea-forensic
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