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Old 02-08-2020, 08:08 AM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vanimal View Post
That makes it much easier to attach an E-trac or quick release trac to the side thru the inside ribbing/skeleton of the van sidewall!
I've attached a few things to those inner ribs---always use the threaded inserts known as pre-bulbed rivet nuts like these: https://www.mcmaster.com/97217a393 They are available in different configurations and are great for thin sheet metal attaching like the bodies of vans.

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Old 02-08-2020, 09:56 AM   #12
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Those pre-bulbed nuts are also known as Plus-Nuts. They are a very nice way of creating secure fastening points. They are available in at least two different spec ranges depending on thickness of the material they are being inserted into.

A special tool is required for setting any of these types of “blind” nuts. The plus nuts usually require a slightly longer bolt than a RivNut.

https://www.google.com/search?q=plus...&client=safari
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Old 02-08-2020, 11:07 AM   #13
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There is also Huck Rivets. They come in many sizes. Many tractor trailer semi manufacturers use them on frame structures for spring/trac arm mounts and crossmembers.They never back off like bolts can. https://www.baysupply.com/5229/Brand...Spin-Lockbolts
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Old 02-08-2020, 05:15 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 1der View Post
Those pre-bulbed nuts are also known as Plus-Nuts. They are a very nice way of creating secure fastening points. They are available in at least two different spec ranges depending on thickness of the material they are being inserted into.

A special tool is required for setting any of these types of “blind” nuts. The plus nuts usually require a slightly longer bolt than a RivNut.
Once upon a time there were rather inexpensive but effective parts I bought to set these nuts with nothing more than a Grade 5 or 8 hex bolt and a few sacrificial washers---I can't seem to find them on McMaster any longer--odd because that's where I originally found them.

The more sophisticated (and expensive) tools aren't necessary unless we're using these sorts of fasteners in a production-like situation. The manual setting tools are fine for what most of us would be doing.

What I like about them is their fairly spectacular holding power when installed in something like our interior ribs. The huge backside mushroomed bearing surface is nearly impossible to pull out unlike the typical rivet nuts. In fact in my work van that suffered a rear end collision that sent a lot of tools flying and broke a few of my Snap On tool box drawer locks everything attached to the van via the Plus Nuts was not affected one bit. Not a single sign of stress or strain showing on any part of the assembly where they were a part.

Glad to see a few of us already familiar with these.
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Old 02-08-2020, 06:10 PM   #15
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Something I’ve found quite helpful when educating myself on this topic:

The Essential Guide to Blind Rivets:

https://cdn2.hubspot.net/hubfs/39607...ind-Rivets.pdf

.
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Old 02-11-2020, 08:59 PM   #16
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Cool good reading material.
Some clarity, a Huck rivet although in the rivet family can not be confused with a Blind rivet even though they are similar in their design. The Huck rivet is of greater load carrying/holding capacities. I guess if you put enough Blind (pop) rivets you will get to an acceptable load capacity!
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Old 02-12-2020, 08:15 AM   #17
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One other thing to consider is the strength of the PH crossbars.


I have no idea if SMB is sleeving them these days but lots of folks have bent bars...I'm sure from packing stuff on the roof.


Sleeving the with DOM cro-mo tubing is a popular modification here..with good reason.
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