RV News RVBusiness 2021 Top 10 RVs of the Year, plus 56 additional debuts and must-see units → ×
 


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 12-20-2016, 11:35 AM   #1
Senior Member
 
arctictraveller's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Posts: 3,574
Static electricity and how do you fill your fuel cans?

For several years I have carried three metal fuel cans on top of my Aluminess storage box. As most everyone knows, filling fuel cans in the back of a pickup truck with a bed liner is not recommended and can result in a fire due to static electricity causing a spark. A friend once had a fire while filling his snowmobile from a jerry can while it was parked on his cement floor. So, I wonder what I should do when filling my cans? Removing them from the top of the box is a royal pain, so almost always I have simply climbed up on the back bumper and filled the cans where they live. My thought process says they are as well grounded as the fuel tank in the van since they sit on metal which is bolted to the frame of the van. Still, the van is sitting on rubber tires, so it's not really grounded either. I would assume that the fuel nozzle has a ground wire, and as long as it's touching the metal can, it should be a great place for static to drain. I'm considering making a ground wire with a clamp to attach to each can as I fill it, but where do I connect the other end of the wire? Anyone have thoughts about this? Electricity is not always your friend...............
Attached Images
 
__________________

__________________
Arctic Traveller
KC6TNI
2001 GTRV
Advanced 4wd
Agile Ride improvement package
arctictraveller is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-20-2016, 11:41 AM   #2
Site Team
 
BroncoHauler's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Southern New Mexico
Posts: 9,477
Just buy a diesel Sportsmobile instead
__________________

__________________
SMB-less as of 02/04/2012. Our savings account is richer, but our adventures are poorer.
BroncoHauler is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-20-2016, 11:58 AM   #3
Senior Member
 
shenrie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: boise idaho
Posts: 2,429
Garage
ive seen quite a few vehicles dragging ground straps. doesn't seem like it would be the best ground, but its better than nothing I suppose.
__________________
"understeer is when you hit the wall with the front of your car, oversteer is when you hit the wall with the rear of your car, horsepower is how hard your car hits the wall, and torque is how far your car moves the wall."
shenrie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-20-2016, 12:01 PM   #4
Senior Member
 
rallypanam's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: San Francisco/Nevada City
Posts: 3,733
Nobody lives forever.
rallypanam is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-20-2016, 01:06 PM   #5
Senior Member
 
boywonder's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: So Cal
Posts: 3,212
I usually touch the pump nozzle to the container before squeezing the pump nozzle......away from the opening...haven't seen a spark yet but it seems like a good idea....I do it on my motorcycle's plastic tanks as well.

...and I always put the plastic gas cans on the ground....
__________________
2008 E350 RB passenger 4WD SMB penthouse
2013 KTM 350 EXC
2008 KTM 250 XCF-W
2000 KTM 200 EXC
2003 Honda Element
boywonder is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-20-2016, 02:05 PM   #6
Senior Member
 
arctictraveller's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Posts: 3,574
Quote:
Originally Posted by rallypanam View Post
Nobody lives forever.
True enough, but I'm not ready to go yet, and definately not in a ball of flame.
__________________
Arctic Traveller
KC6TNI
2001 GTRV
Advanced 4wd
Agile Ride improvement package
arctictraveller is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-20-2016, 06:32 PM   #7
Senior Member
 
86Scotty's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: TN
Posts: 8,798
Quote:
Originally Posted by rallypanam View Post
Nobody lives forever.
All these hijinx at the pump means I'm gonna have to put out my cigarette. No bueno.

Just kidding. I don't smoke.

On a similar note, why is static worse in winter? That's the only time I ever notice the car-door-shocking-me thing. I think it has to do with a bad ground or something.
__________________
Currently vanless. Weird.
86Scotty is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-20-2016, 06:46 PM   #8
Site Team
 
BroncoHauler's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Southern New Mexico
Posts: 9,477
Quote:
Originally Posted by 86Scotty View Post
...On a similar note, why is static worse in winter? That's the only time I ever notice the car-door-shocking-me thing. I think it has to do with a bad ground or something.
Drier air. Higher levels of humidity allow some of the built-up electric charge to bleed off. When it's dry, the charges can continue to build until there's close contact with another surface (I prefer my son's ear to discharge my built up carpet electricity).


Herb
__________________
SMB-less as of 02/04/2012. Our savings account is richer, but our adventures are poorer.
BroncoHauler is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-20-2016, 08:14 PM   #9
Senior Member
 
86Scotty's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: TN
Posts: 8,798
Lol Herb. I'll be he appreciates that.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
__________________
Currently vanless. Weird.
86Scotty is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-20-2016, 08:25 PM   #10
Senior Member
 
ShuttlePilot's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 521
My quick answer is that you would connect your ground cable from your can to the pump itself. This assumes the pump housing is connected to a suitable ground rod and that the hose and nozzle are connected by a wire.

An example of where you will see this procedure done is at an airport. If a pilot is fueling from a stationary pump there will be a retractable ground cable that one would clip to the plane, some planes it's even marked where, before fueling. That cable is connected to every part of the pump, hose, nozzle and a ground rod. Another example is fueling a plane from a fuel truck. Same procedure the fueller will connect the plane, the truck and a ground. I've seen fueling operations involving exotic fuels where the person fueling will be wearing a bracelet and wire to connect themselves to the ground circuit.

Here is the part some folks miss. Testing. And people do test. Where ever the spark gap can happen and you've established a safety ground you want to test that with at least a multi meter, don't assume. It should show zero resistance. Not just a continuity tone but zero ohms. I've seen fuellers that were unsure test each connection starting from the "vehicle" working back to the ground rod.

You might get some inquisitive looks/questioning doing any of this in a gas station. I'm the most comfortable to just sit the can on the ground no mater how inconvenient it is. And in some locations it can be a hefty fine if an incident happened and the fire department had to respond. Not to mention a ruined trip.

-Eric
__________________

__________________
2005 SMB RB 4x4 6.0 PSD
A rocket on the pad is safe,
but it's not what rockets are built for.
ShuttlePilot is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off

Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v3.2.3
Disclaimer:

This website is not affiliated with or endorsed by Sportsmobile SIP or any of its affiliates. This is an independent, unofficial site.


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 07:55 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
×