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Old 07-01-2016, 03:57 PM   #1
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Got Hood Louvers Molded into Hood

So, after running high temps and doing research here, I decided to get some RunCool louvers. I don't know exactly the ECT difference since I don't have a way to monitor but just took Hercules on a five day journey through Central Oregon and they worked like a charm. Transmission fan kicked on a few times on the climb up to Crater Lake and again in the Steens but the engine stayed cool. Noticeable drop on the temp gauge.

I wanted a more stock looking hood so I took the louvers to a local body shop. They used panel bonder to "blend" the edges of the louvers to the hood and repainted the whole hood which needed it anyway. I really like the atheistics and function of the new hood.
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Old 07-01-2016, 04:10 PM   #2
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Love it. I might do that to mine!
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Old 07-01-2016, 04:20 PM   #3
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That looks great. I was thinking I could get a fiberglass person to do something similar, but with fiberglass.
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Old 07-01-2016, 04:37 PM   #4
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Thanks guys! I am really happy on how the project turned out.

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That looks great. I was thinking I could get a fiberglass person to do something similar, but with fiberglass.
The body shop recommended using "panel bonder". I hadn't heard of it but they said many new cars are assembled with it instead of welding. Including the F-150. Maybe someone on here has more info.
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Old 07-01-2016, 05:08 PM   #5
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Looks nice and discrete.
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Old 07-01-2016, 09:37 PM   #6
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Those look great. Super clean. I notice you have a 6.0. Does anyone know if louvers are necessary for a 7.3?
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Old 07-01-2016, 09:51 PM   #7
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Quote:
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Those look great. Super clean. I notice you have a 6.0. Does anyone know if louvers are necessary for a 7.3?
I can only imagine the louvers would help to alleviate heat on a 7.3 also. I had to think about a while, but there is no where for the heat to go in the engine compartment. Air comes in through the radiator/grill and then where? Giving the hood spaces for the air to flow only makes since to me. After driving and shutting down the motor, I could barely hold my hand over the louver vents for a few seconds. Also the cabin feels cooler.

These are only my opinions after the first outing with the louvers in the hood. Hope this helps.
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Old 07-01-2016, 09:53 PM   #8
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Quote:
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Those look great. Super clean. I notice you have a 6.0. Does anyone know if louvers are necessary for a 7.3?
I put them on mine, trying to bring down temperatures. I didn't notice a significant drop, but maybe a bit.
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Old 07-02-2016, 09:09 PM   #9
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Years ago, on VW bugs we would put spacers under the hood hinge bolts which held the hood up a bit allowing lots more air movement. I wonder if something like that would improve air flow? It would be easy to test and reverse if needed.
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Old 07-16-2016, 12:28 PM   #10
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I'm a new van-er, but I'm a VW guy, and familiar with the decklid space-out trick as well. I did a similar thing on a few of my Toyota rockcrawlers, because you have very low speeds and high loads. I used spacers at the hinge bolts, spacing up the back of the hood, giving another exit for heat while moving slow or parked - reduced vapor lock quite a bit on one of them. At speed it allowed cool air in, like cowl induction. I think the vents can only help. Any concern about water entry?
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