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Old 01-29-2019, 09:41 AM   #11
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Originally Posted by olivelawn View Post
The 30K, 60K, 90K, 120K were performed by the dealer. I don’t see any mention if a replacement filter on any of the invoices. Is the “trick” you’re referring to the one with the clothes pin? Also, did i read Mark’s writeup correctly...you actually run the engine while the fluid is draining? Do you shift through the gears (while your foot in on the brake) as well?
Without any mention of what parts were replaced or what service procedures were performed I'm purely speculating then. We'll assume the filter was replaced but on another note it's commendable the transmission was serviced regularly but those mileage intervals are a bit sooner than expected---could be more profit-motivated than anything else.

The trick I refer to is when dropping the pan, how NOT to spill all 5+ quarts of ATF. You place a large catch pan of some sort, something with a bigger footprint than the transmission pan and proceed to remove all the bolts EXCEPT for four; two in the front and two in the back. With the catch pan in place loosen the four bolts just enough so with a little prompting or prying the trans pan falls away from the case. A bit of AFT should drain out but just that which is the "over filled" portion in the pan.

Further loosen two bolts those either in front or back so the pan tips downward allowing the AFT to drain into the catch pan. As the fluid stops draining loosen whichever bolts just a turn more but this time also further loosen the opposite end bolts so the pan isn't held against the transmission case and cannot tip downward any further.

This is done is stages until the transmission pan is nearly empty, enough so you can hold the pan against the case, remove the bolts completely and lower the pan into the catch pan. Easy ain't it?

Notice how the filter is situated, remove it and replace with the new part. Thoroughly clean the transmission pan and the gasket, being careful to not bend or otherwise damage it. Re-installed the pan, torque the bolts in the proper sequence and add at least 5 quarts fresh fluid. At this point you're ready to begin the transmission flushing.

(I install a drain plug similar to the oil drain so the above process is bypassed should I need to drop the pan ever again. As Mark says the filter is designed for the life of the transmission and not intended to be changed. You would however do the full flush about ever 50K miles or so.)

You did read correctly in the the engine is running, transmission in Park and wheels chocked or at minimum emergency brake engaged. Watching the line where fluid in the transmission is draining at first sight of bubbles stop the engine immediately. Measure how much fluid was pushed out, refill the case with that amount and repeat this process UNTIL the fluid being pushed out is the same color as that you're dumping back in. Reattach the fluid lines to the radiator cooler, restart the engine and let it reach operating temperature.

Holding the foot brake shift the transmission through the gears holding there for 10 seconds before shifting back into Park or OP, D or L. Check fluid level, refill as necessary.

Stop engine and remove the line where fluid exits, restart the engine and observe what color the fluid is now. Repeat the process until the fluid is now the same color as new.

After all this is finished and buttoned up take the van on a road trip---10-15 miles at freeway speeds would be great. Double check fluid level in the transmission pan and top off if necessary.

This process allows for a complete fluid replacement in the case but the torque converter as well. The 5 qts and filter replacement leaves about 13 quarts of "old" AFT still circulating.

This ain't cheap but its still cheaper than a new or reman'd transmission.
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Old 01-31-2019, 02:21 PM   #12
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According to my local dealer, the Trans Cooler is part 4c2z7a095da and is gonna run me about $122. I found this online: https://parts.lakelandford.com/p/For...2Z7A095DA.html

Looks like this is closer to $110 even online. When you guys said $50, I took that quite literally . Am I better off with an aftermarket option?

-Park
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Old 01-31-2019, 02:28 PM   #13
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You are convinced the cooler is bad?
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Old 01-31-2019, 02:51 PM   #14
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Notice how the filter is situated, remove it and replace with the new part.

I'd like to add two notes here:


1) The filter will likely have fluid trapped in it too, so be ready.


2) The entire time you're doing this the transmission valve body will be dripping transmission fluid on you. Wear clothes you don't mind throwing away. Covering the whole floor under that part of the van with cardboard will save a lot of cleanup later.



Last time I did it, it was on a Crown Vic. Van's a bit easier, more room to work.
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Old 02-01-2019, 04:44 AM   #15
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I'd like to add two notes here:

1) The filter will likely have fluid trapped in it too, so be ready.

2) The entire time you're doing this the transmission valve body will be dripping transmission fluid on you. Wear clothes you don't mind throwing away. Covering the whole floor under that part of the van with cardboard will save a lot of cleanup later.

Last time I did it, it was on a Crown Vic. Van's a bit easier, more room to work.
Agreed which is why I suggested using a catch pan of some sort that's larger than the transmission pan footprint, something like a kitty litter pan. There are also large plastic pans that fit under household washers and dryers; very low profile and would hold any dripping trans fluid missing the catch pan---like this: https://www.lowes.com/pd/CAMCO-Low-P...e-Pan/50195167

FWIW there's probably another 3-5 quarts of fluid above the valve body. When the pan has been drained leaving it in place for a short while (30 minutes) most of the drops are caught in the hanging trans pan--removing it with the catch pan still in place tends to greatly minimize any spillage, fluid still dropping out caught in the pan.

Cardboard is an okay idea but when its tossed into the landfill it contributes ever so slightly to fouling the water supply---better to capture and recycle as much of the trans fluid as possible.

Those of us doing this in the driveway or garage always face a hurdle of not enough room to do this job without making a small mess. Proceeding slowly, having good catch pans, a small bag of oil dry and a good driveway cleaner like Purple Power's Driveway/Concrete Cleaner all help make this not too horrible a job.

Some also use the disposable latex shop gloves to keep their hands clean---can buy those is small packs of 5 or so pairs instead of a whole box of 100+. Cheap enough if you need or want to keep most fluids off your hands.
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Old 02-01-2019, 12:15 PM   #16
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Yeah, I *highly* recommend gloves. I resisted using them for years, but now I wonder why. They make cleanup so much easier, and if I need to switch from a dirty job to a clean one I can just change gloves. Besides, who knows what all that oily crud was doing to my skin?

I get them by the boxfull. Harbor Freight has some particularly good deals. I use nitrile because they're a little easier to get here...also repeated exposure to latex can sensitize you and result in a latex allergy.
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Old 02-02-2019, 04:19 AM   #17
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Yeah, I *highly* recommend gloves. I resisted using them for years, but now I wonder why. They make cleanup so much easier, and if I need to switch from a dirty job to a clean one I can just change gloves. Besides, who knows what all that oily crud was doing to my skin?
Oddly enough I don't use those types of gloves either in my DIY mechanical duties or job as a windshield installer. I tend to make a bigger mess when they're used in either endeavor.

Something about my hands directly on something and not obscured by a glove has me doing a better job. I do wear gloves for hand protection against the weather but when it comes to the more exacting chore of placing glass into its adhesive or other opening its no gloves for me

Of course the girlfriend hates I have crap on my hands but she knew going in I was mechanical in nature so its just a part of the bigger picture.

The more casual mechanic should probably wear the protective gloves though--better in the long run I'm sure.
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Old 02-02-2019, 06:24 AM   #18
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Originally Posted by olivelawn View Post
According to my local dealer, the Trans Cooler is part 4c2z7a095da and is gonna run me about $122. I found this online: https://parts.lakelandford.com/p/For...2Z7A095DA.html

Looks like this is closer to $110 even online. When you guys said $50, I took that quite literally . Am I better off with an aftermarket option?

-Park
That aftermarket ones are fine. I don't buy much from Autozone/Advance but as far as these are concerned the ones they sell have never let me down. They've always been really cheap (like $50 or less) but I haven't bought one in awhile.

I don't buy ANYTHING from a Ford dealer, not even vehicles. Their markup on everything is insane. If I need an OEM part I buy it online. I gotta say, I have never been to the Ford parts counter in my town (30 miles away is part of the reason) and I've owned 6 or 8 Ford vans now and worked on countless others for friends and customers.

Here's what Rockauto has to offer:

https://www.rockauto.com/en/catalog/...il+cooler,2088
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Old 02-02-2019, 08:03 AM   #19
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I don't buy ANYTHING from a Ford dealer, not even vehicles. Their markup on everything is insane. If I need an OEM part I buy it online. I gotta say, I have never been to the Ford parts counter in my town ]

Generally I agree. Although the last time I needed a part (new water pump) I went to my local dealer’s counter to price the part, which was much higher. I showed them the printout of the online OEM Ford part (from White Bear or whatever it’s called now) and they came close enough to matching it, so I bought it at the counter. I think maybe the trick is to go in person to the counter rather than calling it to try a price match so they know you are serious.
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Old 02-03-2019, 10:10 AM   #20
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@TomsBeast: I think the transcooler is bad because I see what I believe is transmission fluid buildup/gunk along the bottom rim (before it leaves towards the lines). I also brought the vehicle to a transmission shop and they thought it needed replacement (but you know...who knows if they're just motivated by $). Once it dries up around here (rain for days),k I'll snap a photo.

Anyone have any experience with this Dorman part? https://www.amazon.com/Dorman-918-20...ds=4c2z7a095da
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