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Old 07-27-2021, 07:54 PM   #1
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Removing jack holder

What are these screws that secure the jack holder to the van floor? I want to take it out but have no idea how to. It has threads but I cannot get the other end (at the bottom of van - last pic) to move. Any tips?

https://www.dropbox.com/s/g2e1udjlmn..._2553.JPG?dl=0


https://www.dropbox.com/s/g21coezrgy..._2554.JPG?dl=0


https://previews.dropbox.com/p/thumb...ue&size_mode=5





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Old 07-28-2021, 08:16 AM   #2
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figured I should drill them out.
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Old 07-28-2021, 08:48 AM   #3
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Yes, drill out the rivets. Coat the any exposed metal in the holes with some rust preventive paint, then either insert a plastic plug or something else to close off the holes. Those holes can be used for routing electrical, if needed. A grommet should be used to protect the wires from chaffing.

While you are playing with your floor consider painting front to back w POR 15 or similar. Up the sides a couple of inches. Tape off (do not paint) the the body attach bolts in case they need to be removed at a later date. Those can be coated with silicone or other protective paint that allows for future removal. All other through holes in the floor should be filled w plugs.

Pay attention to the body seams where they come together. Inspect for missing putty or skipped welds that create gaps for water and dust intrusion. A bright light under the van at night will show some of the gaps. Also look for telltale dust accumulation spots.

Lastly, IF you are putting down insulation and flooring, skip putting any sound deadening such as Noico on the floor itself. That is a complete waste of money, imo, and addition of useless weight. Put "some" adhesive sound deadener patches on the sides/top of wheel wells, up the firewall, inside face of the outer sheet metal on the walls and especially in the doors, where it helps deaden sound transmission.

Oh, and if attaching/fastening the wood floor to the van floor (unnecessary,with forethought, if you are installing cabinets attached to the walls and wood floor) , try to use the holes that are already present. These should be installed w rubber washers (and silicone) against the metal floor, top and bottom to reduce sound transmission through the bolts/screws and to seal off for water penetration.

fwiw -
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Old 07-28-2021, 08:56 AM   #4
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Wow thanks for the info Ray, much appreciated.

Can you elaborate on the fastening (or not) of the floor to the van floor? Why does that depend on the cabinet attachment? I was thinking of putting 1/4" neoprene on the van floor ribs, then 1/2" osb, then vinyl, attaching all with something like spray glue. Thoughts?
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Old 07-28-2021, 09:33 AM   #5
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No worries.

I always consider that at some point everything installed will have to be removed, probably because of a water spill/plumbing leak where the water will find it's way through to the metal van floor. So nothing that may need to be removed is permanently affixed.

Also, our van bodies flex and anything hard attached to the metal floor AND the walls is having to contend with that flex. Cabinet joints get stressed and separate and then squeak.

Properly cut and configured the floor can be done with about three sheets of plywood to cover from B pillar to back doors and side to side. Keep most of the joints under cabinets or seats. Biscuit joint (large ones) the edges but instead of glue use a Simpson Strong Tie TP3 or TP4 plates and short screws at the seams to keep the plywood pieces together. Your vinyl can go over all of it and the plates even though visible under the vinyl will be hidden in cabinets or under the seats. The biscuit joints keep the pieces from moving up and down relative to each other and the plates keep the pieces from separating laterally. The floor becomes a completely connected unit. Just remember that the vinyl, if fun continuously) will have to be cut if it ever necessary to remove the floor. (note - loncoin or diamond plate look vinyls are a pain to clean as the raised features make sweeping out frustrating)

The cabinet backs get attached to the walls via a bolted nailer across the face of the inner wall or cross nuts (not rivnuts) installed in the inner wall sheet metal. The cabinet bases are attached to the floor plywood. This allows the wood floor to flex relative to the walls.

I do not like OSB in vans as it is not great at handling/holding fasteners, it is heavier than baltic birch, and you would have to use exterior grade to contend w moisture/spills.

Neoprene (closed cell) is fine for decoupling (sound/temperature) the plywood from the metal floor but it should be adhered to the bottom of the plywood, not the metal floor. Perhaps consider a Van Bed Rug as your decoupling layer. There is no need to fill the valleys in the floor with anything. Air is a great insulator IF you can keep it still (stops convection and conduction but not radiation). The open valleys at least give any spilled water a chance to find a way out.

Hope that helps.
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Old 08-01-2021, 12:49 PM   #6
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Thanks Ray!
Unfortunately as you wrote this I already cut the OSB to size, so that will go in, but I did cover it with a layer of sealant to hopefuly prevent moisture issues. The only thing that slightly worries me in this regard is the condensation from the rear AC unit.
Other than that, vinyl will cover the OSB and hopefully prevent moisture issues.
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